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Broadband Question

Capricorn

OSNN Senior Addict
#1
I am not really sure if a Broadband Question is right for this Forum and if not please excuse me.

What I wondered was:-
If your line is Broadband Enabled, and you have a Broadband modem connected to your telephone socket, can you use a splitter with it, so that the Broadband modem is connected to one side of the splitter, and a dial up modem connected to the other side of the splitter?

And if so, does the dial up modem, and the Broadband modem, need to have filters, or is it only other telephones connected to the circuit that need filters?
 

GoNz0

NTFS Stoner
#3
Originally posted by Teddy
Broadband modems do not use your telephone line. They install a completely separate cable.
Wrong
#
ADSL works on the same twisted pair of copper wires that the telephone uses. the microfilter is used to seperate a dsl enabled line back to a generic phone on 1 side, then 2 other filter'd channels to allow up and download bandwidth.

in theory you could use a dial up modem and a broadband connection. so long as it is on 2 pc's. you cant run dial up and broadband on the same PC, there 2 conflicting setups and wouldn't work at all.
 
K

Kvasi

Guest
#4
Originally posted by Teddy
Broadband modems do not use your telephone line. They install a completely separate cable.
They call DSL services broadband, so broadband can use your telephone line.


DSL modems use splitters. So you can connect an analog modem like before.
 
#5
Originally posted by Teddy
Broadband modems do not use your telephone line. They install a completely separate cable.
Not with ADSL. Only with cable (well it shares your TV cable in most cases but yea)

I believe you can still use a dial-up modem on the phone side of the splitter yes.
 

ming

OSNN Advanced
#7
Originally posted by GoNz0
Wrong
#
ADSL works on the same twisted pair of copper wires that the telephone uses. the microfilter is used to seperate a dsl enabled line back to a generic phone on 1 side, then 2 other filter'd channels to allow up and download bandwidth.

in theory you could use a dial up modem and a broadband connection. so long as it is on 2 pc's. you cant run dial up and broadband on the same PC, there 2 conflicting setups and wouldn't work at all.
Totally agree with what you said. ADSL runs on the same cables as your telephone line. However, the filter splits the line into a high frequency (for ADSL) and a low frequency (for normal phone use).
As for using narrowband and broadband together on one machine - windows will only use one of the connections and not both (even if it shows that both are transmitting a signal).
 

GoNz0

NTFS Stoner
#8
he describes it as ADSL.
if i remember right cable broadband is a still cable, using cable. imho they had no place using the broadband name, it just confuses people who arn't clued up on adsl broadband and the cable "fake" broadband.. its still cable and always will be. i think lol

the 1st months of cable broadband, the amount of people in my shop who had brought a broadband router and the damn thing didnt work as NTL repackaged a lower bandwidth 128k package as broadband.

'make it stop'
 
#9
Originally posted by GoNz0
if i remember right cable broadband is a still cable, using cable.
What?

Firstly the term broadband refers to the band of frequencies is available to transmit information.

Anything greater than 64 Kbps is considered a broadband connection (this is disputed and differing depending on who you ask)

Cable internet uses the CATV system in much the same way ADSL uses the PSTN.

I could easily say the same as you for ADSL, ADSL is a phoneline and always will be ;)

Cable is in no way a fake broadband technology. Indeed its technology is known to offer better performance and reliability as well as the huge prospects cable has for expandability that DSL technology lacks (especially with a BT phone network in place).

With that in mind why do you see cable as a fake broadband solution?
 

SPeedY_B

I may actually be insane.
#10
Anything greater than 64 Kbps is considered a broadband connection.
I know you're right, but in my opinion, that's not broadband, that's just .. a-bit-faster-than-56k-band :p
It should be 500K+ that's classed as broadband.
 
#11
Originally posted by SPeedY_B
I know you're right, but in my opinion, that's not broadband, that's just .. a-bit-faster-than-56k-band :p
It should be 500K+ that's classed as broadband.
I guess were dealing with two ways of looking at it, broadband judged in speed or broadband judged in the technical way :p

Obviously the consumer they will judge it by speed. However seeming as here in the UK its generally only 512 or above you can get so you cant go wrong anymore.

In my mind slow would be 128 or lower, Medium would be 256-500, Fast would be 500 or above. So i would agree with you if my thinking were based on speed.

But of course they are all broadband connections :D

*rubs head* Right. Yes.
 

SPeedY_B

I may actually be insane.
#12
Well to me, cable has meant cable and broadband has meant DSL.. that's just the meanings of the word to me though. But both are broadband technologies. I suppose that cable to some people doesn't mean broadband because other things are offered via cable too..

As for speed, If I remember right, NTL where slapped for retailing their 128k package as broadband, because it's too slow even though it uses a broadband technology, the same speed can be achieved with a dual isdn line... I'll try find some more info on that though :)
 

SPeedY_B

I may actually be insane.
#13
NTL's 128k service is/is not broadband - ASA
By Tim Richardson
Posted: 09/04/2003 at 11:22 GMT

NTL is fuming following a ruling by the advertising watchdog that the unqualified use of "broadband" to describe its 128k service was "likely to mislead" punters.

The ruling against NTL, published today, was made even though the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) acknowledged that cableco's 128k service met industry definitions laid down by regulator Oftel.

<snip>
Full article: http://theregister.co.uk/content/archive/30168.html
 
L

lechtard

Guest
#16
Originally posted by GoNz0
in theory you could use a dial up modem and a broadband connection. so long as it is on 2 pc's. you cant run dial up and broadband on the same PC, there 2 conflicting setups and wouldn't work at all.
When you are talking about dsl maybe, but with cable this is wrong ...
 
#17
Originally posted by lechtard
When you are talking about dsl maybe, but with cable this is wrong ...
You can use your cable modem and then the cable telephone line for dial up, but your right you cant without a phone line of somesort which some cable customers dont have.
 
#18
i think you know what i mean enyo, cables always been known as a cable modem etc, and broadband terminology hit in the uk with ADSL :)

NTL as always running behind and trying to pick up on the broadband business from BT ;)

the funny thing was NTL was doing the half mb cable setup then introduce 'broadband' at 128k and so on...

no wonder no 1 likes em eh lol
 

Capricorn

OSNN Senior Addict
#19
Sorry I did not mean to start any arguments. All I know is that my BT Exchange is referred to as being ADSL enabled, meaning that it has been upgraded for Broadband.

I have a BT line. I am fairly sure that I can connect both a Dial up Modem, and the Broadband Modem, to the same BT socket using a splitter. They would not be in use at the same time. But the dial up, may become handy, if there is any trouble with the Broadband Provider.

What I am not sure of is if both of these modems need filters, the same as any telephones attached to the same curcuit would need?
 

SPeedY_B

I may actually be insane.
#20
You need filters on every socket (that has something attached to it) the one side of the filter will only be used by your DSL modem, the other side is used for anything that went into your phone line before it was DSL enabled.
So phones, fax machines, and dial-up modems go in the filter.

In this house we have three phones, and one DSL modem, the phones downstairs are using filters, and the phone and DSL modem share a filter upstairs.

Hope that helps :)
 

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