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What is MCP?

#2
On my 780i motherboard there are 3 temp readings.

CPU
Board
MCP

I was reading here

http://www.evga.com/forums/tm.asp?m=235778

but I still don't understand what exactly the MCP is. I believe from that thread I am at normal temps but not good temps since mine is steady at 70 degrees celcius.
I just realized that maybe I misinterpreted you and you're asking what the normal temperature of the MCP should be. Nevermind the rest if that's the case. :)

http://www.nvidia.com/object/nppa.html:

MEDIA AND COMMUNICATIONS PROCESSORS (MCP)
Paired with first- or second-generation NVIDIA nForce IGP/SPP processors, the media and communications processors (including the MCP-D and MCP-T) offer the world's only integrated audio processing unit (APU) for a complete digital media experience. The NVIDIA SoundStorm™ audio solution delivers unprecedented 3D positional audio effects and real-time encoded Dolby® Digital 5.1 cinematic-quality audio. To complete the integrated digital media gateway functionality, the NVIDIA nForce MCPs exceed the traditional Southbridge connectivity with serial, parallel, ATA100, HomePNA, up to six USB ports, and NVIDIA StreamThru™ technology for the smoothest video and audio streaming possible. The NVIDIA nForce2 MCP incorporates additional functionality including DualNet™ dual Ethernet ports, support for USB 2.0, and IEEE-1394a/FireWire® for the ultimate in digital, high-speed connectivity. Together, first- and second-generation NVIDIA nForce platform processors offer customers the pinnacle of PC design, digital media features and technology innovations.
 

Bman

OSNN Veteran Original
#8
Alright I understand sorta. If it is part of the motherboard then why does it have another temperature. And so 70 is alright for a temp?
 
#9
Basically, the north and south bridge chips of a motherboard make up the bulk of what is referred to as the motherboard "Chipset".

i.e. The south bridge has some elements that are usually common to many motherboards that don't necessarily use the exact same north bridge. Your 780i is your north bridge. Someone with a 750i (if that exists, I'm less familiar with nVidia's chipsets for Intel) might still have the same south bridge as yours. Basically, the most important/fancy features are in the north bridge with stuff like networking/USB, et cetera in the south bridge.
 
#10
Alright I understand sorta. If it is part of the motherboard then why does it have another temperature. And so 70 is alright for a temp?
Just because. :nervous:

Because it's an important chip. The north bridge normally has it's own heatsink and fan. The south bridge sometimes has neither. Personally, if that's accurate (not all temperature readings are), 70 celcius sounds pretty high. That's 158 Fahrenheit. You can add after-market heatsinks and/or fans to help. I've done that with some motherboards that their south bridge got way too hot.

Sorry we're playing message tag...
 

Bman

OSNN Veteran Original
#11
So how do I find after market fans/heatsinks and know how to put them on if I "technically" don't know what they are. And frankly, I have never had issues with that before an any motherboard that I have had, have never really looked or cared. Is this normal, could it be because of something I damaged on the board or something else?
 

Temperal

OSNN Junior Addict
#13
Bman, after reading through the forum you linked to as well as some others it sounds like your temps are normal compared to the majority of other folks out there with the same chipset. It also sounds like it is in spec, but a high temp compared to what people would like.

Most people have taken the heatsink off and cleaned off all of the thermal paste that is between the heatsink and the chip. They then have applied aftermarket thermal paste, like Arctic Ceramique. Ceramique seems to be the paste of choice because it does not cunduct electricity. It would appear that this is not improving temps by much though.

The other option is to take the heatsink off and buy a new heatsink with an aftermarket fan. This seems to work quite well but is a bit of a pain for something that may not be a problem to begin with.

Personally, if you are not having any problems I would leave it be. If you really want to do something, I would take the heatsink off, clean it up and put new paste on. When you put the heatsink back I would just check to make sure that it is not bent at all and "seats" itself well on the chip. If you are uncomfortable at all with removing the heatsink I'm sure there are plenty of people on the forum that would be more than happy to walk you through it. I would be happy to look into it for your chipset. I have replaced the heatsink and fan on mine but it is much older motherboard.

Temperal
 
#14
Just to confirm - You did mean is 70 deg C ok right? Whether the temp. is in deg C or deg F changes the answer to your question.

70 F is cold and no issue. 70C is hot, but not bad for an Nvidia chip. They normally run chipsets hotter than they run CPUs.

I'd probably not look at additional cooling for it if it was less than 70 C under heavy load.

The new MBs use passive cooling on the chipsets to keep noise down and depend on the exhaust air from the CPU cooler blowing across the chipset and voltage regulators to cool the MB components.

BUT, depending on the CPU cooler you picked and the MB layout there may not be any airflow across the MB chipset. My freezer 64 is specially shaped to cool the MB voltage regulator but puts no airflow across the chipset.

I've done things as simple as putting an old video card fan on top of the chipset heatsink with double sided thermal tape, but extra chipset cooling hasn't made much of a difference in overclocking so I don't bother anymore.
 

Bman

OSNN Veteran Original
#15
Thanks to both of you. I don't seem to have any problems but when I turn my system off and open my case to feel my hard drives, motherboard and videocard, they are vey hot, if i leave my hand on it they would actually burn it. That is what bothers me, I don't know if it's normal or not.

If I could get help with removing it and replacing it with a better one when I get one that would be great. I have only checked the temps within the BIOS, I have not run any programs within windows yet so I dont know how bad they get. I think everything is fine and will be fine but if I can get everything colder it would be great.
 

Temperal

OSNN Junior Addict
#16
Can you post your CPU and Motherboard temps so we can get an idea of what the overall temp is inside the case. You indicated that everything seems warm/hot to the touch which would indicate that the overall temp inside the case is warm so consequently the MCP temp will be higher.

LeeJend makes a good point about warm air over/around the MCP making it more likely that the MCP temp would be up. If the temp in the case is higher than putting an aftermarket fan on the MCP will not help much either because it will just move more warm air around. When the overall temp in the case is warm then you start looking at increasing the amount of cool air brought into the case and increasing the amount of hot air you exhaust out of the case. Sometimes this is as easy as swaping out inefficient fans at the front and the back of the case with better fans. Sometimes it is just a case of dirt/hair/fur clogging up the intake or exhaust areas.

Temperal
 

Bman

OSNN Veteran Original
#17
I will take screenshots and pictures of my system setup when I get a chance tomorrow or the next day. That will give you guys a good picture of everything. Oh and what is the best (your opinion) temp reading program out there?
 
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#18
Personally, if you are not having any problems I would leave it be.
I agree with what Temperal is saying. If you're not having any trouble and putting thermal paste, heatsinks and fans in case isn't second nature to you, then I would leave well enough alone.

Also as he said, I've repaired computers before that their only problem was excessive dirt in the fans. The most recent one was dirt clogged in the CPU heatsink and fan. Cleaning it out solved the problem.
 

Bman

OSNN Veteran Original
#20
I agree with what Temperal is saying. If you're not having any trouble and putting thermal paste, heatsinks and fans in case isn't second nature to you, then I would leave well enough alone.

Also as he said, I've repaired computers before that their only problem was excessive dirt in the fans. The most recent one was dirt clogged in the CPU heatsink and fan. Cleaning it out solved the problem.
Well this is a brand new system, there is no dirt within it, not yet. The thing is I used to be quite able to hack around a computer system, that is why I know what I know. It is just these days I have come to not do it as much and things are forgotten, or certain things such as the MCP I never bothered with before. I enjoy the idea of making my system as good as it can be, so I would love to do what I can, I am a quick learn.

So I will get some screenshots and such asap.
 

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