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Cracking mail accounts.

L

Lee

Guest
#1
I have a very old .hotmail.co.uk account, it's a 'colour' (at) .co .uk, I only got this colour as the other colour I wanted had gone.

I don't use it that much, I to be honest only sent 1 e-mail from it to a person I know in my Village.

Since I have had it, it's bombarded with cracking attempts, fake websites masking to be microsoft making out I asked to change my password if this is true go here and sign in to do it etc.

The latest one: www.passport.net

I know that m$ would not ask me for my pw or username and stuff, this is pissing me off, it makes me think what is the point in having a unique account, I keep receiving so much b.s. I was wondering what to do.

So I am asking advice.

(I don't like to be beat in a failing manner like this.)

1. Ditch the account and let somone else take the crap?
2. Sell it?
3. Give it to someone ?

If you want to know the account addie pm me. If I know you I will reply.
 

Henyman

Secret Goat Fetish
Political User
#2
http://www.passport.net/ is legit??

it looks legit and uses https as wellk as:
erver Used: [ whois.opensrs.net ]

passport.net = [ 65.54.179.226 ]
Registrant:
Microsoft Corporation
One Microsoft Way
Redmond WA 98052
US
Domain name: PASSPORT.NET
Administrative Contact:
Administrator Domain domains@microsoft.com

One Microsoft Way
Redmond WA 98052
US
1.4258828080
Technical Contact:
Hostmaster MSN msnhst@microsoft.com

One Microsoft Way
Redmond WA 98052
US
1.4258828080
Registration Service Provider:
DBMS VeriSign dbms-support@verisign.com
 

SPeedY_B

I may actually be insane.
#3
Yes, passport.net is a legitimate Microsoft web-site, it's their universal single-sign-in service which you can use on anything that supports it, however most people just use it for hotmail and msn messenger. :)
 
L

Lee

Guest
#4
Just though it odd that I had around 70 e-mails with reference to changing ones password, like for example, 'your recently tried to change your password' (I didn't), if this was the case click link below and sign in, stuff like that.

All from that address.

I did however change my password, I did test out my password on a zip cracking application, even after 8 days it still didn't find the password.

I just don't know why lamers would want that e-mail account, granted it's unique, but hey just another e-mail account.
 

Xie

- geek -
#5
Lee said:
I just don't know why lamers would want that e-mail account, granted it's unique, but hey just another e-mail account.
To use for spam/pr0n/illegal activitys. Most emails hacks fall into one of those. ;)
 

jimi_81

Moderator
Political User
#6
i remember reading IE security issues where a website url could pretend to be legit as well as the https....

are you even using IE?
 
#7
that would be hacking not cracking. cracking si the process of removing copy protection from software..

But yes if you are getting mail from ms saying you tried to change your passord then someone is attempting to break in.
 
L

Lee

Guest
#8
LordOfLA said:
that would be hacking not cracking. cracking si the process of removing copy protection from software..

But yes if you are getting mail from ms saying you tried to change your passord then someone is attempting to break in.
Go read about the definitions of a cracker and a hacker then come back and correct your statement.
 
#9
hacker is a coder, well a clever coder

cracker is anyone who attempts to break through computer or digital security

thats my understanding anyway
 

SPeedY_B

I may actually be insane.
#10
*puts on pedant-o-hat*

hacker
[originally, someone who makes furniture with an axe] 1. A person who enjoys exploring the details of programmable systems and how to stretch their capabilities, as opposed to most users, who prefer to learn only the minimum necessary. 2. One who programs enthusiastically (even obsessively) or who enjoys programming rather than just theorizing about programming. 3. A person capable of appreciating hack value. 4. A person who is good at programming quickly. 5. An expert at a particular program, or one who frequently does work using it or on it; as in a Unix hacker. (Definitions 1 through 5 are correlated, and people who fit them congregate.) 6. An expert or enthusiast of any kind. One might be an astronomy hacker, for example. 7. One who enjoys the intellectual challenge of creatively overcoming or circumventing limitations. 8. [deprecated] A malicious meddler who tries to discover sensitive information by poking around. Hence password hacker, network hacker. The correct term for this sense is cracker.

The term hacker also tends to connote membership in the global community defined by the net (see the network. For discussion of some of the basics of this culture, see the How To Become A Hacker FAQ. It also implies that the person described is seen to subscribe to some version of the hacker ethic (see hacker ethic).

It is better to be described as a hacker by others than to describe oneself that way. Hackers consider themselves something of an elite (a meritocracy based on ability), though one to which new members are gladly welcome. There is thus a certain ego satisfaction to be had in identifying yourself as a hacker (but if you claim to be one and are not, you'll quickly be labeled bogus). See also geek, wannabee.

This term seems to have been first adopted as a badge in the 1960s by the hacker culture surrounding TMRC and the MIT AI Lab. We have a report that it was used in a sense close to this entry's by teenage radio hams and electronics tinkerers in the mid-1950s.

cracker
One who breaks security on a system. Coined ca. 1985 by hackers in defense against journalistic misuse of hacker (q.v., sense 8). An earlier attempt to establish worm in this sense around 1981-82 on Usenet was largely a failure.

Use of both these neologisms reflects a strong revulsion against the theft and vandalism perpetrated by cracking rings. The neologism "cracker" in this sense may have been influenced not so much by the term "safe-cracker" as by the non-jargon term "cracker", which in Middle English meant an obnoxious person (e.g., "What cracker is this same that deafs our ears / With this abundance of superfluous breath?" - Shakespeare's King John, Act II, Scene I) and in modern colloquial American English survives as a barely gentler synonym for "white trash".
k? :) :p
 
#11
mmhmmm and you download cracks from a cracker not a hacker...

Seriously these definitions are outdated and like alot of terms their meanings change over time.

Hackers breach security, crackers remove copyprotection from protected software and hardware.
 

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