When should you partition?

Discussion in 'Windows Desktop Systems' started by xsivforce, Mar 24, 2002.

  1. xsivforce

    xsivforce Prodigal Son Folding Team

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    I noticed at work, my computer is partitioned to where the OS is on one partition and pretty much everything else is on another partition. What is the advantage of this? Is there a disadvantage?
     
  2. da rock

    da rock Guest

    among other things it means in case of system crash,say c:drv.
    where the os is,than you should only have to reformat and reinstall that partition,not the entire thing. so by using a partitioned hd is kinda of a insurance policy against losing all your files.:)
     
  3. Qumahlin

    Qumahlin Moderator

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    There is no real disadvatage, just make sure you give your windows part room to grow. and always make sure the swap file and windows are on the same partition.
     
  4. xsivforce

    xsivforce Prodigal Son Folding Team

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    When I have some more time, I may just do that. When I do I'll make sure I ask the right questions. Thanks da rock and Qumahlin.
     
  5. dreamliner77

    dreamliner77 The Analog Kid

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    Regarding partitions, I've been told that there is a way to have windows on one partition and all of your programs on another partition so that if you do a fresh install, you won't have to reinstall all of your programs. I guess I'm just a little slow and don't understand this. If you do a fresh install, wouldn't you have to reinstall all of your programs. Am I missing something?
     
  6. cheezzzz

    cheezzzz Guest

    Some programs have to be reinstalled. I have tried installing my programs in a drive other than where the OS is installed but found out that it was the case. No sense in installing programs out of the OS's drive. Its better if you reinstall programs or applications after a Windows reinstall, that way you know all of them works. After I install all my applications, configurations, virus scan, defrag.....I do a little checking around to make sure everything is in order. Then I create an image using Drive Image. So if I install and test other programs I just restore the drive image if something is screwed up. Any comments on what I do?

    The Cheezzman
     
  7. dreamliner77

    dreamliner77 The Analog Kid

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    All sounds good to me.

    Couple of question for you or anyone. I have (cracked) copies of Drive Image 5.0 and Ghost 2002

    ANyone have any preferences on which one to use and/or know where I could download any manual for either?
     
  8. cheezzzz

    cheezzzz Guest

    The manual is in the respective programs under a pdf file. I would prefer to use Drive Image. Simpler to use from windows.

    The Cheezzman
     
  9. Binary

    Binary Guest

    There is a huge advantage in installing programs outside the os partition when you have a dualboot (or even a tripleboot) installed. Then you can install a program to a shared data partition and not lose too much valuable space. The same holds for the swapfile, which can be placed on a shared partition and it will be recreated at every boot.
    My personal preference for an image tool is Norton Ghost which works perfectly. Though not under WinXP, and I'm sure neither will DriveImage. You will need to boot from floppy to directly address the harddisk, which WinXP will not allow. But the choice is really a matter of what you're use to. They both work fine.
     
  10. RobbieSan

    RobbieSan Guest

    It's a great idea to have multiple partitions. I have the following setup at home and it works great.

    Disk 1 - 40GB
    Partition 1 - C: - 2.5GB WinMe (just in case)
    Partition 2 - D: - 8GB XP Pro
    Partition 3 - E: - 29.5GB Programs and Data

    Disk 2 - 40GB
    Partition 1 - F: - 2.5GB reserved for WinMe but currently blank
    Partition 2 - G: - 8GB reserved for XP Pro but currently blank
    Partition 3 - H: - 29.5GB Backup of E:


    I use Drive image to backup my XP Pro partition then store the image on E: I use InSync to make a comparative copy of all files of E: on H:

    As a note I usually make at 2 different images of my XP partition:

    1. when freshly installed and set up in the most basic way
    2. after installing the most common programs I use and configuring the system to my liking


    On occasion a program will crash the system and you will have to restore one of the images. Drive Image will create 2 diskettes for you to boot up with. This program has saved my bacon more than once. When you restore an image, any programs you had installed will not need to be reinstalled, assuming they are in the same location as before.

    Hope that helps.
     
  11. xsivforce

    xsivforce Prodigal Son Folding Team

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    I might just have to get a second hard drive and do some of this stuff. I like the idea of backing up the OS.
     
  12. Binary

    Binary Guest

    You can do a backup of the OS even with one harddisk. To do that you need minimum 2 partition and if you run low on space you can even put the file on a CDROM. No problem to put it back from there in case of need.
     
  13. xsivforce

    xsivforce Prodigal Son Folding Team

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    Thanks, good idea.
     
  14. Perris Calderon

    Perris Calderon Moderator Staff Member Political User

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    xsivforce
    I know you've been on the other string, but for others on this string, it seems ms says if you're not on fat, partitioning is couterproductive for the average user...also, partitions is a terrible solution for backups...hard drives fail all the time...to follow the string I'm referancing, go here
     
  15. xsivforce

    xsivforce Prodigal Son Folding Team

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    ok...understood. Did see that on the other thread. M$ suggests it is counterproductive on NTFS. Best way for me to back up is on removable media (i.e. CD) Thanks dealer.

    BTW: Your avatar keeps me drooling. My keyboard doesn't like that. ;)
     
  16. Perris Calderon

    Perris Calderon Moderator Staff Member Political User

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  17. RobbieSan

    RobbieSan Guest

    I can understand that but I still prefer to have partitions and a second HD.. there's just too much info to fit onto CDROM's and DVDRW's are still too expensive for the average user..
     
  18. Perris Calderon

    Perris Calderon Moderator Staff Member Political User

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    robbie, we should all run our box the way that suits us personally...performance or no, there's still alot to be said about organizing your installation, for instance, I don't think even if ms is correct, the differance would be noticeable, so, if you like the organization of partitons, then go ahead and organize, but for those people that partition because they thought they were supposed to, well it seems as if microsoft is telling you your computor is less efficient with partitions, so don't
     
  19. RobbieSan

    RobbieSan Guest

    Amen to that!
     
  20. Binary

    Binary Guest

    Microsoft forgot to tell you all that it is extremely counterproductive to install Windows on your machines. It will slow them down terribly. As will any program you install, be it on one partition or more.