usb 2.0 to firewire converter

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by the_music_man, Feb 8, 2004.

  1. the_music_man

    the_music_man aka prodj88 =P

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    i searched and coudln't find any? I don't think it even exists. Someone needs to invent this!! They will get big bucks.
     
  2. Dubbin1

    Dubbin1 I Like Cheese

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    I don't really see a need for this since most computers now a days have both USB 2.0 and firewire.
     
  3. the_music_man

    the_music_man aka prodj88 =P

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    well some just come with usb 2.0
     
  4. ElementalDragon

    ElementalDragon The One and Only

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    don't know if anything was ever, or will ever, be made like that. for one, they're 2 completely different standards. also, wasn't FireWire originally a Mac only standard?
     
  5. Khayman

    Khayman I'm sorry Hal... Political User Folding Team

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    can't find one either. But there are plenty of firewire add on cards around, quite cheap

    (btw ElementalDragon max size is 500 pixels wide and 150 pixels in height. Please adjust
    http://www.ntfs.org/forum/showthread.php?t=34)
     
  6. SPeedY_B

    SPeedY_B I may actually be insane.

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    IEEE 1394

    A very fast external bus standard that supports data transfer rates of up to 400Mbps (in 1394a) and 800Mbps (in 1394b). Products supporting the 1394 standard go under different names, depending on the company. Apple, which originally developed the technology, uses the trademarked name FireWire. Other companies use other names, such as i.link and Lynx, to describe their 1394 products.

    A single 1394 port can be used to connect up 63 external devices. In addition to its high speed, 1394 also supports isochronous data -- delivering data at a guaranteed rate. This makes it ideal for devices that need to transfer high levels of data in real-time, such as video devices.

    Apple made it, but it's not exclusive.