Switching between Domain and Workgroup often

Discussion in 'Windows Desktop Systems' started by Punkrulz, Jul 27, 2005.

  1. Punkrulz

    Punkrulz Somewhat eXPerienced

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    Hey guys,

    I think I've run into a situation where I would need to switch between a domain and a workgroup often. I have a work laptop, and while I'm there I will need to be on the domain so I could check email and stuff like that. I could VPN in, but that's more of a hassle than if I was on the domain.

    When I'm at home, there are some things I have to be on the workgroup so that I could connect my laptop and desktop together over the network.

    The problem I've seemed to run into is that if I'm at home, and I join the workgroup, I'm not going to be able to join the domain until I go back to work... Is there anything I could do to make this easier?

    Is it possible to VPN in, and then join the computer to the domain that way?
     
  2. madmatt

    madmatt Bow Down to the King Political User

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    Join a domain and when you login at work log into the domain. When you are at home log into the computer name.

    However, there is no easy way to switch back and forth. Domains use net logon for AD.

    You're likely to cause a bigger headache if you keep switching from a domain to a workgroup.
     
  3. VenomXt

    VenomXt Blame me for the RAZR's Folding Team

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    seconded. can you log onto the admin account as that is a local account.
     
  4. Punkrulz

    Punkrulz Somewhat eXPerienced

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    Yes I know that I am able to login to the local account. However, it seems that regardless the computer either has a setting that it's on the workgroup, or on the domain... not like saying, "Well logging into this account places it on the domain, and this account will be on the workgroup". I logged into the local account, and I had to move that to workgroup... then the login for domain went away. :/
     
  5. madmatt

    madmatt Bow Down to the King Political User

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    GPO's from a domain/AD setting are applied to computers that are apart of the domain. If in fact you are away from the office and logging into the local machine GPO's are still applied. Newer GPO settings such as Windows Firewall have profiles for both domain and local.

    If you are logging into the local machine your laptop is still apart of a domain, you're just using a profile saved locally instead of using profile settings from AD.

    And of course, once you change to a workgroup the domain settings disappear.

    But, as we said if you keep switching between a domain and a workgroup you are going to give yourself a bigger headache.
     
  6. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

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    IMO, the easiest way, although it's a headache to maintain, is to dual-boot. Have a WinXP partition with domain access, have another with workgroup access. Since you power down between work and home anyways, it wouldn't be too bad. However, if you do this, I would recommend having a 3rd FAT32 partition, so that you can access critical files without running into permission problems. Or, configure proper NTFS permissions, but you won't have access to the group memberships from both OS's.
     
  7. Punkrulz

    Punkrulz Somewhat eXPerienced

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    Location:
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    Actually,

    I seem to be running fine having my laptop on the workgroup permanently, and using the same username / password combination I have for my work account. I guess the AD server sees the user/pass combo and it's all good? I don't know... but it's working fine.
     
  8. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

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    Well, my guess is that when you are at work you are just logging onto your workgroup there as well. When you login locally, you are bypassing the domain, and you won't be receiving any of the functions that you would be if you were on the domain, (i.e. mapped drives, scripts, etc.)
     
  9. madmatt

    madmatt Bow Down to the King Political User

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    Uhh. Uhh. When you authenticate you send not only your username and password but the domain you are apart of. If you try to open the Event Viewer and connect to a server I bet it fails.

    However, if you were to connect your notebook to your company network there is no reason it wouldn't work (Internet access, email, etc.) depending on your network security. Your DNS server is going to hand out an IP address to any device that connects but AD will not authenticate it unless it is apart of the domain.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2005