Static IP assignment?

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by frenche31, Dec 20, 2004.

  1. frenche31

    frenche31 OSNN One Post Wonder

    Messages:
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    I'm trying to get another server up and running, and i would like it to be on a static IP (naturally) so that i don't have a server that keeps getting lost.

    The question is, how do i do it? I would like to think that it would be easy enough, but i can't find an options page on my linksys router that allows me to set a static IP within my LAN - its like its DHCP or bust.

    I'm running a Linksys BEFSR81.

    Any help on how i can exempt a single IP from DHCP allocation would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. CipheR

    CipheR OSNN Junior Addict

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    Static IP

    The option for setting a computer to static is not going to be found on the router, it doesn't have anything to do with the router. Just set the IP in the TCP/IP properties on the computer itself and all will be good.

    CipheR
     
  3. frenche31

    frenche31 OSNN One Post Wonder

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    can't the DHCP then reallocate my server's IP if i ever reboot the system?

    i had the IP fixed on ther server itself but had shut the computer down over the weekend cause i hadn't made it secure yet and didn't want it sitting there unprotected - and when i rebooted, it said there was an IP conflict on the network (i. e. another comp had already taken the IP)

    i guess i can just reassign one every time i reboot, but i thought i could come up with a dedicated IP too.
     
  4. Mainframeguy

    Mainframeguy Debiant by way of Ubuntu Folding Team

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    I am afraid the option of a static IP address is not really entirely in your hands - you need your ISP to hand it out to you. Even then do check the contract carefully - often they may reserve the right to reassign under some circumstances (EG if you change your datarates).

    You CAN approximate it with a router you leave powered up if your ISP keeps the service up on a dynamically assigned service it will normally leave an address as yours so long as you "hang on" to it and they do not "take" it away.... but I have no idea how effective this may be.

    Of course this is just talking about IP addresses to the external world - if you mean assigned internal to your network then you have control (or can take control).

    You need to clarify a tiny bit - or maybe I already answered for you?

    Welcome to OSNN too :) Do consider joining our folding team - they're a friendly bunch ;) :cool:
     
  5. frenche31

    frenche31 OSNN One Post Wonder

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    yeah, i know the link to the outer world is out of my control. the WAN is already a fixed IP. thats not a prob.


    i'm wanting to have a fixed IP on my LAN while leaving other LAN computers to be assigned by my local (router) DHCP.

    is that the clarification you were looking for?

    (And thanks for the welcome by the way - glad to be here =)
     
  6. CipheR

    CipheR OSNN Junior Addict

    Messages:
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    Static IP


    You need to assign a fixed IP that is outside of the range you are having your router assign. if you wanted to use 192.168.1.102 then you could tell the router to only assign DHCP IP's from 103 on... etc, etc..

    CipheR
     
  7. Mainframeguy

    Mainframeguy Debiant by way of Ubuntu Folding Team

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    Location:
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    that was the information - and what Cipher says should be helpful, so long as your router lets you do that (I have a Linksys that allows that, and an Edimax that does not, so I know it could go either way - post back and let us know!)
     
  8. frenche31

    frenche31 OSNN One Post Wonder

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    i'm not sure if i can or can't...i did find a starting point for IP assignment, that is, there was a box saying starting IP address 192.168.1.xxx

    i think you can take that and move it up to allow those IPs not assigned underneath the xxx starting point to be static - at least, thats what we are going to try :)
     
  9. Johnny

    Johnny .. Commodore .. Political User

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    Location:
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    You don't need to set your router to anything .. set up a static ip in your tc/ip config settings.

    you set the ip to what ever you want, Make the subnet mask the normal 255.255.255.0, Make the default gateway whatever ip address is used to get to your router - I think for linksys it is 192.168.0.1 unless you changed it, Then use the dns servers your isp is using .. I have all my pc's on my network set up like this. they work flawlessly ..
     
  10. Admiral Michael

    Admiral Michael Michaelsoft Systems CEO Folding Team

    Or just sign it a IP thats greater then the number of computers you have.

    I have 5 comps but my server is 192.168.0.150. Server is DHCP and the range is 100-149
     
  11. Lukas

    Lukas Real Name No Gimmicks

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    If you on the range 10.0.0.x (for arguments sake) and you want your server to have a static ip on your LAN (lets say 10.0.0.1) you can set that in the TCP/IP protocol properties window.

    Then, on your router you have to define an exception within the 10.0.0.x scope of the DHCP server. (That exception would be 10.0.0.1) Then you won't have to worry about that adres (10.0.0.1) accidently beeing assigned to another computer.