Setting up a working 100Mbps Ethernet Network?

Discussion in 'Windows Desktop Systems' started by dcdlking, Feb 22, 2002.

  1. dcdlking

    dcdlking Guest

    I currently have my 2 Windows XP Pro based computers networked through 2 hubs sharing my DSL modem. The network speed is 10Mbps, roughly a megabyte [not bit] per sec. I really want the network to run at 100Mbps, 10megabytes/sec. Has anyone accomplished this?
    All my hardware...hubs,cables,NIC's all support 10/100 so I assume it's possible, it's just never worked when I changed the options in the network cards to 100base TX or 100base TX full duplex, it just said error in connecting to network and my computer's would never recognize each other. Anyone thanks for help ;-)
     
  2. JJB6486

    JJB6486 Retired Mod Political User

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    Usually cable quality and equipment quality have a lot to do with maximum speed. Unless your cables, hubs, and NICs are 100% shieleded from ANY interference, You can very rarely get full 100mbit bandwidth. Using it does significantly raise your bandwith, but the maximum can probably never be reached.

    JJB6486
     
  3. DarkSiege

    DarkSiege Guest

    The speed also changes according to your provider :)
     
  4. shorty420

    shorty420 Guest

    i believe that standard cat 5 is only capably of throuput 10 mbps. correct me if i'm wrong though cause i may be.
     
  5. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

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    You are wrong.
     
  6. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

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    1. Does your ADSL support 100Mbit (most don't)? Is it made for connecting directly into a hub (built-in switch, DHCP, NAT and so on)?
    2. If it's a dual speed hub (and not a switch) you are using, the entire network will be forced down to 10Mbit if any of the connected devices are 10Mbit only.
    3. Set your NIC's to Auto.

    If your ADSL doesn't support 100Mbit I suggest you get a small switch instead of the hub.
     
  7. dcdlking

    dcdlking Guest

    thanx dude, i dunno bout the modem... i have it running into the hub's uplink, works like a charm for cheap internet sharing, i set all my stuff to 10mbit full duplex for now, 100mbit seems far fetched at the moment, i need to research my equipment more.
     
  8. shorty420

    shorty420 Guest

    i figured i was wrong but lemme check my cisco materials and i'll get back to ya.

    :edit:

    you were right. my bad.
     
  9. lelu

    lelu Guest


    Might mention that Category 5E cable, is made to somewhat more stringent standards. Category 5 E is recommended for all new installations, and was designed for transmission speeds of up to 1 gigabit per second (Gigabit Ethernet). :)
     
  10. Shawn

    Shawn Guest

    For a small home network, here is what I recommend (and use). First I will list the equipment, lets assume the network will have 3 workstations and a Cable modem.

    - Cable Modem
    - LinkSys BEFSR11 (Product Page) Cable/DSL Router
    - 1 Netgear model FS105 (Product Page) 10/100 Desktop Switch
    - 3 workstations each with a 10/100 NIC (prefer Intel or 3COM)

    Now, First you want to configure the Router for your connection. After that, all your have to do is cable everything up and make a few small changes on the workstations so they will grab an IP from the router and be in the same workgroup (if you want to share files and/or printers).

    This is the order the devices should be cabled:

    Modem - Router - Switch - Workstations

    As far as the actual ethernet cables go, I would suggest either CAT5E or CAT6, but CAT5 will suffice if (and I doubt it) you can't find either of the others.

    In this configuration you will be able to transfer files between the workstations at 100mb/s, and be able to share your broadband connection without having to pay extra money per month for additional IP addresses from the ISP.
     
  11. dcdlking

    dcdlking Guest

    Thanks for the info, I dont think I'll be buying all the expensive ass hardware just to transfer a whole 9MB faster =(

    It's still beyond me all my stuff is rated 10/100!
    damn world......
     
  12. Shawn

    Shawn Guest

    Zedric already answerd you above about why you are not getting 100Mbit:

    As far as expensive, it might seem a bit of money for what a normal home user gets out of it, but it is a really cost effective solution for most of the people who need something like that.

    Good luck to you.
     
  13. lelu

    lelu Guest

    You shouldn't have any problem finding cat 5E cable. I live in a small town (35,000), called several places to get the best price.. they all had cat 5E. :)

    I used it to install my little home system, for two computers. One computer took 75 feet of cable.
    I used a Linksys BEFSR41 from Walmart.
    Out of the box, plugged in the cables and I was online with both computers... NO configuration of any kind.
     
  14. dcdlking

    dcdlking Guest

    yea, i forgot about that post.... more people post things than anywhere else! i suppose my ghetto dsl modem is MOST LIKELY bringing it down, cuz it's just that... and my 2 computers, and my xbox, but I hardly ever play it meaning its never on... online is too slow for it's time now.
     
  15. your computers may connect to each other at 100 meg but the connection through router will never reach 10 meg so thats the speed they build in them
    all the dsl routers ive see have a 10 meg ethernet connection on them for the inside connection, using 100meg hardware there would be a waste as the throughput will never even reach 10meg to the internet...
    have one friends i set up a server on his dsl with two nics, the one to router runs at 10meg - the inside one runs at 100meg to switch for network and the server proxies....
     
  16. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

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    porthos: No it won't, there's a DSL modem in the way.