Sata/150

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by Bman, Aug 2, 2004.

  1. Bman

    Bman OSNN Veteran Original

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    I have been looking to buy a new harddrive. I might have found one that I want. It is a 120gb Maxtor hardrive, I do not know much about harddrives. I was wondering about SATA/150, this harddrive has this at the end of the name. I do not know what this is, I think its the speed. If so, I heard that it's only compatible with some motherboards. How do I know if mine is....

    Thanks
     
  2. cpugeniusmv

    cpugeniusmv Computer Genius

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    which motherboard do you have?
     
  3. dreamliner77

    dreamliner77 The Analog Kid

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    and why is this in "Graphics Cards?"

    btw, sata/150 just denotes the speed of the first generation of SATA interface.
     
  4. cpugeniusmv

    cpugeniusmv Computer Genius

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    you haven't heard of the new SATA graphics cards? :D
     
  5. Bman

    Bman OSNN Veteran Original

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    It is in here because I made a mistake, I didnt really look at the time. lol oops!

    I have a ASUS A7V8X.
     
  6. dreamliner77

    dreamliner77 The Analog Kid

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    I'm waiting for the new external graphics cards. Apparently they connect to your com port.
    :D
     
  7. Sazar

    Sazar F@H - Is it in you? Staff Member Political User Folding Team

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    Thread moved to General Hardware

    :cool:

    s-ata basically has higher data access (supposedly) than p-ata drives... in real world testing this is not always borne out but the theoretical peak == 150mbps v/s 100/133 for p-ata drives...

    personally i would go with it coz of the wiring setup :cool: and its the way of the future...
     
  8. Bman

    Bman OSNN Veteran Original

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    So, I will work with my motherboard? Thats good! Thanks
     
  9. Skwowwy

    Skwowwy 1337ness

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    Well, instead of a Maxtor HDD, I'd go for Seagate or Western Digital. I've had bad experiences with the Maxtor HDDs: far too sensitive for shocks. Once I did some maintenance stuff to my PC and took out the HDDs (carefully, of course). I didn't even bounce at anything or whatever and when I put them back in, the Maxtor HDD died suddenly, while it was only 6 months old. >_o

    So yeah, if you are a capacity freak, you might want to go for Seagate's 200 GB SATA HDD, although you could go for the Ultra ATA 100 version, as there won't be much difference, because of the drive's capacity and its 8.5 ns seeking time (never got changed compared to the smaller drives, which doesn't make sense, but meh). Will save you at least $50.

    If you aim for performance, you could try Western Digital's Raptor HDDs: 10,000 RPM on SATA interface. Sweet stuff, I tell you. :D

    Or you could just be simple and get a regular, but big, Seagate or WD HDD (120 or 160 GB). Just have a look around on review sites. I recommend www.anandtech.com and www.tomshardware.com

    Good luck! :)

    Edit: To answer your question about motherboard compatibility: I don't know what motherboard you have, but use Google to find its official specs. Use search terms like this:

    [your motherboard's name/model] specs

    - or -

    [your motherboard's name/model] specifications

    It should list what interfaces it supports.
     
  10. cpugeniusmv

    cpugeniusmv Computer Genius

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  11. Skwowwy

    Skwowwy 1337ness

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    Oops, missed Bman's post with the motherboard model. *_* Ah well, it does indeed support SATA, but since it says it's an optional feature, you'll have to make sure by using a diagnostic tool such as Aida32 or SiSoft Sandra or open your box and have a good look at your motherboard. The SATA connector is easy to identify, just have a look at the picture cpugeniusmv provided.
     
  12. Bman

    Bman OSNN Veteran Original

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    What does SATA do? I am buying a hardrive that has it, because I found one for a good price at the size I wanted. I needed to know if my motherboard can support it. That is all I needed to know. Do I have to use it, what does it do?
     
  13. dave holbon

    dave holbon Moderator

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    As a footnote to SATA enabled drives. They will not provide that much of a noticeable boost in performance, usually about 5 to 10% if the implementation is correct. But I notice that prices of these drives are now similar to ATA enabled drives.

    To me this is the last breath drawn for mechanical or optical drives of all types, fitted to what’s become known as personal computers. Solid state drives are the future which are already a factor of over a decade or three faster than the fastest mechanical drives currently available, but at a cost. This cost however is diminishing almost by the hour and I predict that within the next year (ten gig drives) will become available (for loading operating systems) at reasonable cost. Within five years there will be no mechanical drives in use anywhere; this includes all optical drives of all types as these will be converted to “plug-in” solid state devices just like the USB 500meg devices currently available that look like beer can openers.

    Do not invest any money in mechanical drives.

    :) :) :) :)
     
  14. Skwowwy

    Skwowwy 1337ness

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    What SATA is, what's so good about it, etc: http://www.tweaktown.com/document.php?dType=article&dId=605

    We have already found out for you that your motherboard may support it. According to Asus' website, SATA is an optional feature on your motherboard, so you'll need to verify that yourself by looking at the motherboard itself. Find the SATA connector. It looks like this:

    - http://www.tweaktown.com/popImg.php?img=satapt1_03l.jpg
    - http://www.ezguide.co.kr/spec_img/boa/Unitech-865PE-BRAIN-SATA-Port-O.jpg

    If you have it, then you can go ahead and buy the new SATA drive. :)
     
  15. Son Goku

    Son Goku No lover of dogma

    Basically it's serial ATA...so instead of sending multiple bits over the bus at a time (parallel) it sends 1 at a time. No, it doesn't use the COM port, hehe :D

    What you need is a SATA port on your motherboard to make use of this.

    Edit: It is possible to find a SATA controller that can be plugged into the PCI slot. Just looked... Your motherboard might have what you need though, so look there first.

    http://www.newegg.com/app/SearchProductResult.asp?Submit=Go&DEPA=0
     
  16. Bman

    Bman OSNN Veteran Original

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    Thanks everybody for all the help. I have looked at the motherboard and yes it does have the sata connector. So I am going to buy that new drive.
     
  17. toretto

    toretto Mentally Absent

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    see, my video editing, and rendering system has 2 sata wd raptor drives in raid 0, the speed of that system is just phenominal(sp?). as far as general usage tho, i wouldnt do that, i believe in raid and all as i personally notice diffences in load times. But if you just play games, browse the web, chat, email. it can be an expense that is a waste of time.