Quick Question

Discussion in 'Windows Desktop Systems' started by ming, Feb 16, 2004.

  1. ming

    ming OSNN Advanced

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    What are the differences (in any) between RTM and retail versions of an OS?
     
  2. Xie

    Xie - geek - Subscribed User Folding Team

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    you mean OEM?
     
  3. SPeedY_B

    SPeedY_B I may actually be insane.

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    RTM = Release to manufacturers. This is sometimes a corporate edition that does not require a CD-key (imagine installing thousands of copies and needing a unique key for all.. heh) and is "released" before the retail version.

    I think, anyway.
     
  4. Xie

    Xie - geek - Subscribed User Folding Team

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    oh .. some manufactures change things so it'll only run on there hardware and add in there own stuff as well.
     
  5. ming

    ming OSNN Advanced

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    So are you saying that there is NO difference between the two in ANY way whatsoever? (apart from the Activation part for corp and retail of course).
     
  6. NetRyder

    NetRyder Tech Junkie Folding Team

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    Hmm...I think what you're refering to there is the OEM version. That is what system manufacturers like Dell, IBM, HP etc would use to mass-install the OS on all their machines.
    As far as I know, an RTM version of an operating system is just the stage after the Release Candidate (RC) builds that's released to the public as a final build. So Build 2600 of XP would be considered an RTM copy of XP, even if you bought a boxed version from a retail store.
    The so-called Corporate (or Corp) edition of XP is just another name for a copy of XP with a Volume License Key (VLK). For these versions, you would still need a CD-key, but there would be no activation.