Pulled a chip of my 9700

Discussion in 'Graphics Cards' started by Petros, Jun 10, 2003.

  1. Petros

    Petros Thief IV

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    I just yanked a chip off my Radeon 9700 while trying to change to a new heatsink. It has eight tiny legs that attatch to the board. How can I reattach it? Does anyone know where to find soldering tips that small, or maybe something like a conductive superglue?

    Yes, I know.:eek: I found out that manufacturers sometimes glue some chips to the board. I thought they were all just thermal-greased.
     
  2. Goatman

    Goatman Ska Daddy

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    I think you may have a pooched Radeon, it will be very hard to reconnect all the contacts.
     
  3. hikaru

    hikaru Guest

    check this site they have some quite nice information (on PDF) etc. On how to repair SMD based PCB's.
    Don't ask me about the acronyms I think SMD stands for Surface Mount Devices, and PCB Printed Circuit Boards... I think! :confused:
    anyway here's the link. Ecyclopedia of Soldering Techniques, assembling process
     
  4. Friend of Bill

    Friend of Bill What, me worry?

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    Had to edit my post. (I don't want to be "strung-up" before the masses).:rolleyes: ;):D
     
  5. hikaru

    hikaru Guest

    if it's on guarantee I would recommend what the "SnookBooger" said!!!
     
  6. mbunny

    mbunny Guest

    and ask a mod to delete this thread after said letter has been written... no need to give them any evidence ;)
     
  7. hikaru

    hikaru Guest

    I think "Handybuddy" hasn't replied yet because HE HAS NO GRAPHIC CARD!!! to log in to his computer..... lol :D :D

    Q: Why "Handybuddy" disappeard from the forum
    A: Because he yanked a chip off his Radeon 9700!!
     
  8. GoNz0

    GoNz0 NTFS Stoner

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    o man i would cry if i did that.....
     
  9. Petros

    Petros Thief IV

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    Oh man it's bad! I'm still around. I went out the very next minute after it broke and bought a 7500 64MB (which WILL be returned for a full refund upon replacement ;) ). I think I may be stuck playing Icewind Dale for a couple weeks, though.

    Rebuilding new legs with silver epoxy!
     
  10. Un4gIvEn1

    Un4gIvEn1 Moderator

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    just do a nice little superglue job on the old one and swap it with a new.... they will never know the difference :)
     
  11. hikaru

    hikaru Guest

    Another great idea. In case your card guarantee is overdue.

    [edit] post edited... idea may be a little on the other side of the fence :)

    keep posting though... - Sazar [/edit]
     
  12. MdSalih

    MdSalih The Boss

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    /me reinforces the idea that NTFS can not be taken responsible for any actions of our members... we do not support this kind of behaviour.

    On a side note... thats always worked for me :p

    MdSalih
     
  13. daddyo

    daddyo OSNN Addict

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    Well, your card is probably FUBAR'd. Buy the new one and get back to bidness.
     
  14. Petros

    Petros Thief IV

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    Lol...I did that once with my Logitech MX500 just a few months ago...why didn't I think of that? And no, I will not implicate NTFS . org in any way whatsoever if I am caught in my unsavory acts.:cool:
     
  15. Sazar

    Sazar F@H - Is it in you? Staff Member Political User Folding Team

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    keep ideas legit lads :)

    else this thread goes bye bye...
     
  16. Black-Syth

    Black-Syth Comalies

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    i agree with some post above... send it back to ATi... tell them it was like that...
     
  17. GoNz0

    GoNz0 NTFS Stoner

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    Dear ATI,

    I am so dissapointed with the video card i brought bearing your name. Recently I was dusting said card with my screwdriver, after i replaced the card in the PC and attempted to power up... I noticed this little 8 pinned chip embeded about 6mm into my wall.
    I feel ATI should replace the card as the chip could have quite easily penetrated my left testical on it's wayward journey to the wall.

    Also my dusting screwdriver is chipped after said accident, so another one of those wouldn't hurt either.

    (you get the idea on the letter don't you):p :D
     
  18. Petros

    Petros Thief IV

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    ROFL!!

    ROFL!!! Sounds like a good idea to me! No, I seriouly have tears in my eyes...whooo thanks for the laugh!:D
     
  19. GoNz0

    GoNz0 NTFS Stoner

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  20. LeeJend

    LeeJend Moderator

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    Call ATI tech support, confess what you did and see if they will attempt a repair for a flat fee, like $35-50. MSI has a deal like that on their stuff. I said attempt because if you ripped up any of the circuit traces or pads when you pulled off the part the board may not be repairable. If you do any additional damage trying conductive epoxy or soldering yourself they won't work on the board.

    Now the technical stuff:
    Don't even try to fix it yourself. Initial soldering on surface mount devices is done by screening a solder paste onto the board. Placing the parts on top of the paste and then running the board through an oven that flows the paste. Its a "low" temperature process that makes for weak mechanical connections (but you know that now).

    Repair techniques for SMD involve heating the entire board to a high (but safe for the parts) temperature and then using a hot air jet to locally heat the solder past above it's melting point. The work is done under a microscopic viewer so you can actually see what you are doing with the tiny packages.

    A conductive epoxy to reattach the part might work, BUT!
    The epoxy will be a higher impedance and electrically noisy compared to the solder pastes so if the part is a high speed device it may not work or not work reliably.
    The risk is also very high that you will slop some of the expoxy onto another conductor shorting something out. If it's a power lead thats shorted the card will be toast.

    I used to do this kind of work years ago and wouldn't even think of trying it without the proper tools (that's about $10k worth).
    We don't even have that kind of equipment at work (15,000 man aerospace plant) anymore. We farm the work out to specialty shops. Shame we don't have the equipment, could have used it to unlock my Athlon XP. ;)