Pirating twenty-four songs can cost you $225,000 in the US

Discussion in 'Entertainment & Sports' started by Petros, Oct 6, 2007.

  1. Petros

    Petros Thief IV

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    This is disgusting.

    Apparently the burden of proof lies with nobody. All they need is a file name and an IP and you're out $9,250 per song.

    It's a hollow victory for the recording industry. Nobody wants to see a bunch of rich snobs put poor people in stocks and whip them publicly; the backlash will be severe.

    Prohibition II will come to an end soon.
     
  2. Sazar

    Sazar F@H - Is it in you? Staff Member Political User Folding Team

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    Honestly though, she had a crap defense and her lies were pretty sad.

    The other guy had a solid case and RIAA didn't. This was the complete opposite. She should have just settled and been done with it.
     
  3. Petros

    Petros Thief IV

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    Yeah, her lawyer should have come up with something better than the Bart Simpson "I didn't do it nobody say me do it can't prove anything" defense; it virtually screams guilt. If I were up against a possible $3.8M lawsuit, I'd find someone who could do better that that.

    The dollar figure is outrageous, though. They didn't have to prove how many times she uploaded it or anything--they just got to name an arbitrary figure per song.
     
  4. falconguard

    falconguard Carbon based lifeform Political User Folding Team

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    ACtually she had a lot more songs than that, the RIAA only chose 24 to make a point. Although it is lost on me. I don't know if she uploaded but, the RIAA targeted specifically Super servers. There is still one case out there, where the woman has a better case than that one, we are still waiting for it to come to court.
     
  5. Sazar

    Sazar F@H - Is it in you? Staff Member Political User Folding Team

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    Per the case, she went out of her way to hide her tracks, getting a new hdd and all that. As I said, her defense, no specifically her lawyer but her actual defense was bogus. She was guilty as sin.

    The fine is very steep but she should have settled.
     
  6. Maveric169

    Maveric169 The Voices Talk to Me

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    What I find alarming is that RIAA didn't have to prove anything. Under the current cases that and the precidents, all RIAA has to do to sue ANYONE is have an IP. They don't even have to prove you uploaded, downloaded, or illegally aquired a song. You can take a CD you bought, put it on your computer, and RIAA can sue you. Even though you have done nothing wrong.