Monitor Cable Replace or Repair?

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by Brad, May 15, 2006.

  1. Brad

    Brad Moderator Political User Folding Team

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    Is there anyway to do this, or is it screwed?
     
  2. tdinc

    tdinc █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User

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    what kind of Monitor?
     
  3. Brad

    Brad Moderator Political User Folding Team

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    Sorry, it is a CRT. The connection to the actual "display" if you will is inside the monitor, unfortunately I cannot just purchase a cable and install it.
     
  4. tdinc

    tdinc █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User

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    If your feeling froggy take the thing apart and find a replacement cable and rewire it. but since displays are so cheap, it would be best to just buy a new one. :)
     
  5. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

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    What is wrong with the cable itself?
     
  6. gonaads

    gonaads Beware the G-Man Political User Folding Team

    Sounds like it was up against a wall for a bit and the cable was being bent at right angles for way too long. Had a 17 incher that had that problem but mine didn't screw up the cable it popped the solder on the circuit board that the cable was soldered to.

    If the Monitor is not too old and it was working well ya could pop the back cover off and check it out. If it is the solder and yer handy with a soldering gun then fix. No sense in buying anothe Monitor if ya can fix it. And as for another cable. You'ld be suprised as to how many Monitors are laying around some back alley streets. Cut one off a dead one and fix yours.

    Hey if the circuit board is fudged or ya flub it. Then you can go out and get that Flat Panel LCD you always wanted. :D
     
  7. Petros

    Petros Thief IV

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    You know what's the coolest thing about monitors? Those capacitors that hang on to 30k-50k volts. Please post again to let us know you're all right, or at least leave passwords with someone you trust so they can tell us how it went ;)
     
  8. Brad

    Brad Moderator Political User Folding Team

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    The symptoms of the problem are as follows:

    -It is as if the color "yellow" or "blue", or "red" are not getting to the screen
    -If I bend the cable a certain way, all of the channels will get there and I actually get a good picture,

    so I am thinking it is just the cable that has been in a position for way too long and once it was turned a different way, some sort of connection inside the cable broke.
     
  9. mlakrid

    mlakrid OSNN BASSMASTER Political User Folding Team

    you are correct...

    Seriously though, I would check any used computer shop in your area, especially since many of them will trade your old one in as partial payment.

    Or as was suggested you can try and fix it.

    If you do, do NOT touch the Cathode of the monitor or you could wake up minus a finger or two, and thats a good prognosis.

    SO Basically be careful as they carry high voltages days after they have been turned off...

    I hope this helped some...

    ~Mike
     
  10. Brad

    Brad Moderator Political User Folding Team

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    My future father-in-law gave me one of his old monitors, but it is a beautiful display. It handles colors excellently and it even comes with some BNC connectors on the back:eek:
     
  11. gonaads

    gonaads Beware the G-Man Political User Folding Team

    Well there ya go. Now you're happy and ya don't have to play "Zorro" with any capacitors. :p






    *Zorro = poking and prodding. Causing serious lose of bodily functions* :D
     
  12. Vanquished

    Vanquished Mr. Bananagrabber Political User

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    Its great, the capacitors in a psu are such fun. Short one of those babies out for a nice show :)
    Don't touch them yourself, use a stick :)
    lol
     
  13. LeeJend

    LeeJend Moderator

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    Repairing the cable depends on where and how it broke. Borken wire, wires that rubbed through the insulation and are shorting to each other or to the shield, broken connection at the circuit board in the monitor, broken connection at the PC connector end, etc.

    Monitor cables have special requirements and you can not just string some wires together. You will need a new cable (or one scrapped off another Monitor).

    Repairing one requires skills and knowledge of trouble shooting a damaged cable and some tools. The PC end connector is usually molded rubber which means cutting it off to inspect the end. Skill at soldering to replace a connection. If the break is in the middle finding it and splicing it is iff'y at best.

    If you have an old VGA cable with connectors on both ends you can cut off the monitor side end strip the wires back and use that. The hard part will be figure out which wire goes to which pin on the old and new cables (there is no standard color coding on the wires). That will require an ohm meter and be complicated by the fact that the old cable has a problem already.

    Your best bet is to ask a local shop what they want to replace the cable. Probably as much as a new 17 inch monitor costs. Burdened labor rates run $100-200 an hour and they will rob you blind on the cable (and probably use one cut off an old monitor). It's about a 30-60 minute job for someone who knows what they are doing and how the stupid case comes apart.

    Why is this bull**** still circulating?

    Any TV or montior sold in the United States or the European Union in the last 30 years is required to have bleeder resistors across high voltage capacitors. They discharge to safe levels in 3-5 minutes.

    This is an old wives tail spawned from vacuum tube TV sets in the 1960's.

    Unplug the monitor, turn it on and wait 5 minutes. There is no risk of shock hazard. Do not plug in or work on the Monitor with the case open.

    I've been working on TVs/Monitors since the 1960's (and yes back then my Dad and I put on a pair of 1/16 inch thick rubber gloves to work on the TV). Now by the time you figure out where all the hidden screws are to get the case apart the high voltage has been discharged as required by Government Safety regulations.
     
  14. Vanquished

    Vanquished Mr. Bananagrabber Political User

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    PSU's still are dangerous :)
    That makes me happy :)
     
  15. LeeJend

    LeeJend Moderator

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    Nice advice...
    1) a stick won't short anything out. It has to be metal like a screw driver shaft.

    2). A capacitor or battery can (and do) blow up if discharged too rapidly due to excessive internal heating.

    3). An electircal arc generates high levels of UV light which burns out the rod and cones in the retina of your eye. That leaves a permanent spot where you can not. Very common with people doing arc welding and it occasionally happens to electrical workes.

    Nice way to blind and/or scar yourself permanently.

    If you have to discharge a capacitor you use a 1 meg ohm resistor and let it sit for 5 minutes.

    PS The power supplies are required to have bleeder resistors also. By the time you can get into one it is safe.
     
  16. Vanquished

    Vanquished Mr. Bananagrabber Political User

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    nonsence,
    simply take it out of the case and unscrew the cover while its plugged in...
    By a stick i meant like attache a paper clip to the end of it or something.

    Im gonna have to say that this conversation about amlost killing ourselves should be over, the thread wasn't about that :)
     
  17. mlakrid

    mlakrid OSNN BASSMASTER Political User Folding Team

    If it is still BS then why is it normal industry practice to use a grouding rod and discharge them, especially if they are at "safe"levels? If they are so safe, I would challenge anyone to make a video and lick the nodes, and distribute said video.

    Also, it has NOT been this way for over 30 years... when I was a Cryptologic Technician in the Navy and we had to dispose of CRTs, we got the fire works displays every time from discharging them using a grounding rod... and that was my first duty station back in 1992-1994
    so unless things have changed a TON since I worked on the CRTs I would NOT trust that they discharge to what any reasonable person would consider safe.

    just my $.02...
     
  18. Vanquished

    Vanquished Mr. Bananagrabber Political User

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    INterestesting.
    I thought that it was more than 5 minutes when i sparked the psu :)
     
  19. Brad

    Brad Moderator Political User Folding Team

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    guys, guys....it's ok. Thank you very much. The point of the matter is, is that I saw that it isn't going to be a "swap out" operation and I didn't want to run the risk of electrocuting myself (I have been shocked by a capacitor before), so I asked my future father in law and he was happy to comply.

    Thanks all!
     
  20. Vanquished

    Vanquished Mr. Bananagrabber Political User

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    Haha,
    your right.
    anyways, not that I helped in the slightest bit, but glad it worked out for ya!