How do developers come up with the #'s for the patch?

Discussion in 'Web Design & Coding' started by homesick1337, Feb 3, 2006.

  1. homesick1337

    homesick1337 Computer Lover

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    Example I and my friend got into a long debate about patch #s.

    He said

    "First off the next patch will not be "1.10" If anyone knew about software upgrades/patches..or even the decimal system, you would know that 2.0 follows 1.9...or even 1.91 or 1.92 or sometimes written like 1.9.1 or 1.9.2. "


    This is in reference to a recent patch from a game we play. I told him that I am not sure and he insist that he’s right and the company is wrong.

    Can someone shed some light on this , I was always curious about this.
     
  2. Brad

    Brad Moderator Political User Folding Team

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    Major Version.minor version. build number
     
  3. Sazar

    Sazar F@H - Is it in you? Staff Member Political User Folding Team

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    You can do the same with office projects as well. As you save revisions and changes, it can automatically update the version for you.
     
  4. madmatt

    madmatt Bow Down to the King Political User

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    All companies do it differently. There is no predefined standard, but Brad's post sums it up.

    Builds are sequential but by the time it hits the market there might be a wide gap inbetween the previously released version and the new version. A lot of builds are internal builds and used for testing purposes.
     
  5. Geffy

    Geffy Moderator Folding Team

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    I usually use
    Major.Minor
    where major is function overhaul or something like that and minor represents a patch or bugfix

    Ideally I should probably use Major for something bigger then Minor for overhauls (though not entire system overhauls that would be major) and then another option for patches and bugfixes. But as madmatt mentioned there is no predefined standard for version number schemes.

    though first off what was the current patch number?

    FreeBSD for example has -p# for patch levels and versions just increment from 0 on upwards with really minor revisions getting low point suffixes. ie 5.0.2. Though they have had 4.9, 4.10, 4.11
     
  6. Sazar

    Sazar F@H - Is it in you? Staff Member Political User Folding Team

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    Like matt's sig.

    It is currently psuedo-hotpink ver 1.69

    He is working his way up to 1.1337
     
  7. mooo

    mooo thecyberninja

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    haha 3.1337 would be better but its ok ;P
     
  8. madmatt

    madmatt Bow Down to the King Political User

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    Don't you two turn this around on me. I was told I would get my X1900 card faster if I made my sig pink.
     
    Son Goku likes this.
  9. Son Goku

    Son Goku No lover of dogma

    Nah, we just think you look "pretty in pink" :eek: :laugh:

    Speaking of which, if you'll make your sig pink for a new card; would you wear pink for a whole new, $10,000 computer? :D Just an idea, not offering what I couldn't afford to buy right now...

    Yes, and thx for getting the sig on a few lines :)
     
  10. mooo

    mooo thecyberninja

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    Hell i would paint myself pink for a month for a $10000 box lol.. Just find me a supplier :)
     
  11. Perris Calderon

    Perris Calderon Moderator Staff Member Political User

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    so his question is could a revision go from 1.9 (one point nine) to 1.10, (one point ten) which though it could happen, it seems to mathematically incorrect
     
  12. X-Istence

    X-Istence * Political User

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    Mathematical is not part of it. Companies can call it anything they want. FreeBSD has had versions 4.10, 4.11, 4.12, then 5.2.1. Most of the minor patches that fix just bugs are -p# like Geffy said.

    It really depends on the organization. To most developers it is not all that weird to see patch 1.17 come out. I personally go with the FreeBSD system when it comes to patches. Major.minor-patchlevel.

    Minor is really an understatement, as Major only changes when core functionality is really changed in such a drastic way that it provides something better over previous version, or breaks compatibility with older systems.
     
  13. Mooz

    Mooz Moozically Con~foozed

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    M#.m#.b#

    Major is any change that means the user would change the way they use a product ie a functionality change

    Minor is a change that is visible but does not change the functionality

    Build is a release that addresses bugs and fixes etc