Graduate Job in Networking

Discussion in 'Windows Desktop Systems' started by John Smith, Dec 19, 2002.

  1. John Smith

    John Smith Guest

    I have just graduated, and have landed a job as a network officer at a school. I am the sole network supervisor of the school, and I have no help to any difficulties that I may have, so my last resort is this forum.

    The current network has 15 Pc’s connected to 1 hub and onto 1 server. The various Pc’s have operating systems varying from win95 to win98, and the server is running Windows NT 4.0.

    What they require me to do is upgrade the network to Windows XP, install an extra hub, and link the server to broadband so all users can link to the net.

    Sounds simple I know, but being my first real job, I don’t want to look like an idiot, if the network completely crashes.

    My question is:

    What would be the hardware requirements for the Server and P.C to run XP?

    Can the Server be XP, and can the P.c’s run there own operating system (i.e.) 95, or do they all have to be XP?

    How would the Server be connected to the broadband? And is it easy to configure the network for all users to share the broadband?

    Are there any other area’s to consider for this job?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    Many Thanks.
     
  2. the_tazinator

    the_tazinator Are we there yet?

    Messages:
    177
    Location:
    In a house
    First if all... Welcome to ntfs.org

    Now on to business. There are several ways to set up a network like you discribed and if you ask 5 different people you will get 5 different answers, so here is mine. Get a router, connect it to your broadband connection, plug your switch/hub into your router, connect all of your servers and clients to the switch/hub. Another thing that you want to make sure you have since you are on a broadband connection, is that you have some sort of firewall and since you have several machine I would recomend that it be at you connection to the ISP (get a router with firewall features). That will pretty much do it as far as the networking goes.

    For the PCs/Sever, depending on what you are actually using the server for, I would not recommend using XP since XP was designed to be used as a client OS and not a server OS. I would suggest Windows 2000 server. As far as hardware for the server, get as much as you can. Better to have to much than to little. For the clients, upgrade if you can. XP is much more stable and it works well with W2K server.

    That is my breif opinion. I am sure someone else will have some other ideas for you.
     
  3. jonocainuk

    jonocainuk Guest

    I am an IT technician for a company, and our system sounds exactly what you're looking to do with yours.

    I'll start at the top (internet)

    1. get a router (get the correct one for DSL or Cable Modem - they are different - some people dont seem to realise). The router can be a good addition to your security due to the NAT compatibility - you could get a router with a built in firewall just to be safe. Most routers come with the IP being in the 192.168.1.x range... keep it this way 192.168.1.1 is an idea. Make sure its not accessible from the WAN (broadband connection/internet).

    1a. if you get a router with 1 port, go to 2a.
    1b. if you get a router with 4 ports, go to 2b.

    2a. link a hub to the router using an Xover cable (or take advantage of the uplink ports - they often do the Xover for you.)
    2b. link the server to the router using an Xover cable (i think it is).
    (note if you have a 4port router, link the hub to the router with an Xover as in 2a).

    3. connect all systems to the hub (add more hubs using Xover cables or uplink ports on the existing hub/router (if you have 4 port router)).

    4. when all systems are connected, run through the Windows XP network setup and then when thats done, make sure they're all in the IP range that the router is on (192.168.1.x - IPs can start at 192.168.1.1 and end at 192.168.1.254 (1.0 and 1.255 are reserved for somethin or other lol - i dont know why)). Give each PC an IP address, all using a Subnet address of 255.255.255.0, a gateway address of 192.168.1.1 (if you keep the router address as it usually is by default) and the primary DNS should also be 192.168.1.1 (same as the gateway IP).

    5. when that is complete, unshare the "Shared Documents" on each client system and set up shared folders on the server system (making sure you set permissions up for each user correctly - just so no little sprat kid nicks anyone elses school work LOL).

    6. test each computer and login (that you setup) that you can get onto their own personal network folder, and that you can access the internet.

    7. any problems, post back here an someone is bound to be able to help you (i check the forums frequently in work (nothing to do, the ppl stopped breaking their computers - gives me some free time :p)


    good luck :)
     
  4. koko

    koko Got Root?

    Messages:
    577
    Location:
    Columbia, S.C.
    now there's an answer! damn! :)

    yeah, networking pcs with a router is simple. as a last resort to networking my pc (winxp pro) with my wife's (win98se), i installed netbeui. worked like a charm.

    and btw john, welcome to ntfs.org!
     
  5. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

    Messages:
    4,006
    Location:
    Sweden
    For the workstations is strongly suggest you move to XP instead of 9x if they are > PII 300 with > 128MB RAM. XP is way more secure and easier to secure towards the users (brats). The server should be 2k server or NT server (like you have now). Another tip is to use Mandatory Profiles (think that's what they're called) so that everyone starts out with the same settings everytime they log in.

    As for the network a router is the best choice if you want a NAT network. However if you have IP:s to go around it may be better to set up a transparent firewall (there are linux dists for this) between the network and the Internet.

    With a router you can use DHCP to assign IP:s automaticaly. Sometimes it's better to assign them staticly though. It's all a matter of taste and how important it is that a workstation has a certain IP. For instance you may want computer #13 to have the IP 192.168.1.13.
     
  6. RabidPenguin

    RabidPenguin Guest

    Don't ever install netbuei. There is a reason it does not install with XP.
     
  7. TechSupport

    TechSupport Guest

    /me is jonocainuk usin his works nick (can leave this logged in lol)

    i forgot to mention the O/S's to be used.

    i would definitely use Win2K Server for the server O/S and XP Professional for the clients.

    To get Win98 working perfect with WinXP, just enable NetBIOS over IPX/SPX. you dont need NetBEUI


    i prefer static ip addressing as if a computer isnt getting on the network, you can start diagnostics from the comfort of your own office (ping the IP - you know PC #13 will be 192.168.1.13 etc - just like Zedric said :))
     
  8. must be nice to not seem to even know some basics and get a job while others have certs and vast knowledge and theres no jobs........ depends on who you know and where you live i guess......
     
  9. RabidPenguin

    RabidPenguin Guest


    Someone is a bitter. :blink:
     
  10. Burpster

    Burpster Guest

    think that goes for most jobs ....always who you know :)
     
  11. TechSupport

    TechSupport Guest

    ... or what you can give them... not that im implying people giving out "favours" for a job...
     
  12. Lactic.Acid

    Lactic.Acid Guest

    Originally posted by jonocainuk
    1. get a router (get the correct one for DSL or Cable Modem - they are different - some people dont seem to realise)

    Actually, they are not different. What this person will probably be purchasing is a router aimed for the home/small office user (which he is). These do nothing but grab a DHCP address from an ethernet connection (which goes to the cable/dsl modem).

    2a. link a hub to the router using an Xover cable (or take advantage of the uplink ports - they often do the Xover for you.)
    2b. link the server to the router using an Xover cable (i think it is).
    (note if you have a 4port router, link the hub to the router with an Xover as in 2a).


    If your hubs don't have uplink ports, trash them and get some decent hubs. This network is large enough that the purchase would be warranted. And if you have a router, you use a normal ethernet cable to connect to the server, not a cross-over cable.

    The link to the hub from the router will go to your uplink port with a regular ethernet cable as well. If your employer won't spend the money for a new hub and you have no uplink port, then you would use a cross-over cable.

    4. when all systems are connected, run through the Windows XP network setup and then when thats done, make sure they're all in the IP range that the router is on (192.168.1.x - IPs can start at 192.168.1.1 and end at 192.168.1.254 (1.0 and 1.255 are reserved for somethin or other lol - i dont know why))

    It will be easiest for you to set the router up to act as a DHCP server and configure the clients accordingly. Then you needn't concern yourself with "making sure" they're in the same subnet.

    Aside: When you set this up, your IPs will actually probably be 192.168.0.* by default. Your subnet mask will be 255.255.255.0. What this does is tell a computer what network you are on by ANDing the netmask with the IP (when both are represented in binary), that leaves your network number, in this case the network number is 192.168.0.0 (this is why the .0 address is reserved) and 192.168.0.255 is the broadcast address. Both the broadcast address and network number are used in TCP/IP communications, stuff you needn't worry about.

    Give each PC an IP address, all using a Subnet address of 255.255.255.0, a gateway address of 192.168.1.1 (if you keep the router address as it usually is by default) and the primary DNS should also be 192.168.1.1 (same as the gateway IP).

    Again, you should be using DHCP so you don't have to worry about this stuff. And incidentally, your DNS server should not be the router address, as most SOHO routers don't forward DNS queries. The DHCP addressing will take care of all of this information for you.

    5. when that is complete, unshare the "Shared Documents" on each client system and set up shared folders on the server system (making sure you set permissions up for each user correctly - just so no little sprat kid nicks anyone elses school work LOL).

    I would highly recommend you not do this. It's not very secure and there is no way to perform backups short of manually backing up each PC.

    Your server that you set up should be running Windows 2000 Server, and you should read up on and consider setting up a domain to give you increased control over each PC. Without this, any security you institute on the PCs will be easily over ridden by anyone who wishes to do so. If you go this route, you can create a network volume on the server and create user directories and assign user rights to each directory accordingly.

    No offense, but you might be in over your head unless you're willing to go out and pick up a good book or three on setting up domains so that you don't leave them with a swiss cheese network. But best of luck to you, there are plenty of capable individuals here to help you out.
    /L.A
     
  13. RabidPenguin

    RabidPenguin Guest

    Good post Lactic.Acid

    Just a one thing I would like to add...



    Again, you should be using DHCP so you don't have to worry about this stuff. And incidentally, your DNS server should not be the router address, as most SOHO routers don't forward DNS queries. The DHCP addressing will take care of all of this information for you.

    If setting up a W2k domain then the DNS server will need to be the W2k server in order for Active Directory to function properly.
     
  14. cashishift

    cashishift Guest

    i'd probably setup permissions on the server, then lock down the pc's with user profiles..

    if you have them logging into a domain, you can setup policies that way anyways.

    and DHCP is the only way to go.. no worries.
     
  15. jonocainuk

    jonocainuk Guest

    I wouldnt use DHCP personally... easier to keep track of system problems without the need for extra programs cuz u know where each IP is being used imho.

    dsl routers have a built in dsl modem whereas the cable modem routers dont... THATS the difference - and from experience, its easier to use a DSL router for DSL than messing around with extra hardware which isnt needed... just one more thing to go wrong


    and yeah, id set permissions to folders on the server, getting it to synchronise data on logoff + logon to the client
     
  16. RabidPenguin

    RabidPenguin Guest

    You lock down with Group Policies not with User Profiles.
     
  17. cashishift

    cashishift Guest

    user, inside of a group

    same diff.
     
  18. Lactic.Acid

    Lactic.Acid Guest

    Actually, a "dsl router" with a built in DSL modem is backwards; it's a DSL modem with a built in router. Most companies like linksys and netgear sell DSL/Cable routers, into which a cable or DSL modem is plugged in.

    I would not consider a DSL modem with a built in router in this situation, those are designed for very small home offices and home users, not business/etc. usage like this situation. You should keep in mind that right now, you only have 20 or so PCs. A year from now that could easily double, so you should design everything accordingly.

    Thanks, that right there might be more recognition/appreciation than I got in the four months I was a moderator here (when it was xp-erience).