Encrypted files? Need Help

Discussion in 'Windows Desktop Systems' started by Heeter, Jan 9, 2006.

  1. Heeter

    Heeter Overclocked Like A Mother

    Messages:
    2,732
    Hi Guys,

    I just finished putting together a computer for my friend. It's new from the ground up. His HD from his previous machine was put into the new one as a slave. There was two users on the previous machine, each with their own logon. With the new XP Pro install he is trying to get into the his old documents and settings folder on the slave drive and it is saying C:/ error inaccessbile, or something like that. He is trying to remove his pictures, movies and IE favorites list from slave so it can be reformatted.

    How can we get into these folders for both users?

    Thanks in advance,

    Heeter
     
  2. Hipster Doofus

    Hipster Doofus Good grief Charlie Brown

    Messages:
    5,920
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    See how this goes>>>

    Microsoft

    HOW TO: Take Ownership of a File or Folder in Windows XP
    Applies To
    This article was previously published under Q308421
    IN THIS TASK
    SUMMARY

    How to Take Ownership of a Folder
    How to Take Ownership of a File
    REFERENCES
    SUMMARY
    This article describes how to take ownership of a file or folder to which you have been denied access.

    If you require access to a file or folder to which you do not have access (permission), you must take ownership of that file or folder, where you replace the security permissions to allow yourself access.

    back to the top
    How to Take Ownership of a Folder
    NOTE: You must be logged on to the computer using an account that has administrative privileges. If you are running Windows XP Home Edition, in order to have access to the Security tab, you must first start in Safe Mode and log on with an account that has Administrative rights.

    If you are using Windows XP Professional, you must disable Simple File Sharing. By default, Windows XP Professional uses Simple File sharing when not joined to a domain. For additional information about how to do this, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    307874 How to disable simplified sharing and set permissions on a shared folder in Windows XP

    To take ownership of a folder:
    Right-click the folder you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties.
    Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message (if one appears).
    Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab.
    In the Name list, click your user name, Administrator if you are logged in as Administrator, or click the Administrators group. If you want to take ownership of the contents of that folder, click to select the Replace owner on subcontainers and objects check box.
    Click OK. The following message appears, where folder name is the name of the folder that you want to take ownership of:
    You do not have permission to read the contents of directory folder name. Do you want to replace the directory permissions with permissions granting you Full Control?

    All permissions will be replaced if you press Yes.

    Click Yes.
    Click OK, and then reapply the permissions and security settings that you want for the folder and its contents.
    back to the top

    How to Take Ownership of a File
    NOTE: You must be logged on to the computer using an account that has administrative privileges.

    To take ownership of a file, follow these steps:
    Right-click the file you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties.
    Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message (if one appears).
    Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab.
    In the Name list click Administrator, or click the Administrators group, and then click OK.

    The Administrator or Administrators group now owns the file. To change the permissions on the files and folders under this folder, continue to step 5.
    Click Add.
    In the Enter the object names to select (examples) list, type the user or group account to which you want to give access to the file. For example, Administrator.
    Click OK.
    In the Group or user names list, click the account that you want (for example, Administrator), and then click to select the check boxes of the permissions that you want to assign that user. For example, Full Control [Allow]. When you are finished assigning permissions, click OK.
    back to the top



    REFERENCES
    For additional information about file and folder permissions, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    161275 Interaction of File and Folder Security on NTFS Volumes
     
    Heeter likes this.
  3. Heeter

    Heeter Overclocked Like A Mother

    Messages:
    2,732
    Thanks Leejend,

    I will try tonight, hopefully will work. Really hopefully.

    Heeter
     
  4. NetRyder

    NetRyder Tech Junkie Folding Team

    Messages:
    13,256
    Location:
    New York City
    LeeJend? :D
     
  5. Heeter

    Heeter Overclocked Like A Mother

    Messages:
    2,732
    Hahaha, what was I Thinking??????

    I mean Hipster Doofus, Sorry HD :)

    Good Catch Nets,

    Heeter