CPU pins - fixable?

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by Eck, Dec 6, 2003.

  1. Eck

    Eck .user

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    Alright, so I was switching out my 2.4GHz with a 3.0GHz. While taking out my 2.4GHz, I had a little trouble. When I took off the heatsink-fan, the chip was stuck to the bottom of it. I didn't pull it exactly straight out and I bent a few pins. Also, the lever on teh ZIF socket stayed down (probably not a good thing).

    My 3.0GHz when in fine and all is good there. Then I went to put the 2.4GHz in an older system and I thought it went in fine. It acted like I had all the pins straight. Then the system wouldn't boot, and I finally got around to taking out the CPU. Sure enough, 1 bent pin. I tried fixing it, but eventually it broke off.

    Now what do I do? I don't have anything to soder with. Is it even possible for a pin to be soddered back on? If so where could I get this done? Is my CPU dead?

    :(
     
  2. Xie

    Xie - geek - Subscribed User Folding Team

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    I'm no expert but I think you have one dead cpu on your hands :(
     
  3. Sazar

    Sazar F@H - Is it in you? Staff Member Political User Folding Team

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    bent pin == can be straightened..

    broken pin == dead cpu afaik :(

    I installed my friends 2.4c... all well and good... then he pulled it out for whatever reason when he got home... came back to me the next day saying it didn't work... I had made absolutely sure everything worked the night before so I was a little confused..

    turned out he had pushed the cpu in and bent 1 pin... fortunately he managed to straighten it and its working fine...

    you can check some other forums and some hardware places if they can do anything about it... alternatively if your cpu is under warranty than perhaps you can check about getting an RMA.. else you have a dead cpu :(

    hard luck m8...
     
  4. GoNz0

    GoNz0 NTFS Stoner

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    if u walked into my shop trying to rma a cpu with a bent/broken pin... well, after i stopped laughing at you, I would inform you that i had just voided all warranties on anything you brought for being stupid enough to try and exchange a cpu with a snapped pin :p

    you wouldnt be the 1st either ;)
     
  5. Eck

    Eck .user

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    Damn. Not looking good. Looks like I'm going to have a keychain valued at $150. Bling bling...
     
  6. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

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    Looks like you have nothing to loose. Solder it back on! :) It's tricky, yes, but I guess it could be done with a small soldering iron, tweezers, small amounts of solder and alot of patience. I mean, it's not like it's going to get worse... :)
     
  7. Sazar

    Sazar F@H - Is it in you? Staff Member Political User Folding Team

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    the problem with the soldering is the conductivity..

    I am not sure you are going to have the same conductivity as you had before..

    rather than solderng which might screw up some other pins nearby you might want to try thermal adhesive...

    its tricky and I dunno how it will hold for something like a cpu pin but its liely less damaging than soldering on a cpu I think...
     
  8. LeeJend

    LeeJend Moderator

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    Depends on what is going through that pin.

    First off the pin spacing is .05 inches, which is way smaller than any soldering iron tip so your looking at getting solder all over the place. Also the pins are gold plated and solder and gold plating do not get along well. The solder wicks the gold out of the eutectic causing eventual metal and plating fatigue.

    On the other hand:
    Since it is a non-returnable keychain now you might try cutting a peice of 24-26 guage wire tinning the bottom of it with solder then wrapping it around the soldering iron tip. let the iron heat the wire until solder will flow on the end of the wire. Then place the wire onto the base of the pin. It might solder in. Unplug the iron and let the whole thing cool down. When cooled, cut the wire off flush with the other pins. Work using a magnifying glass or jewelers loop. This wil be one ****ty solder connection. Now very carefully insert the CPU in the socket and hope for the best.

    If it works you owe me your first born female child. If it doesn't work I never heard of you.

    An even worse option might be conductive epoxy but that is really stretching reality. Also risky becasue epoxy goes everwhere but where you want it.

    Good luck man. I figure the solder trick in the hands of skilled tech has a 50-50 chance at best. The epoxy much lower for mechanical strength and messiness reasons.
     
  9. Eck

    Eck .user

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    Never soldered before in my life. Time to drill a hole in it for my keychain. :-/
     
  10. LeeJend

    LeeJend Moderator

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    Friends, relatives, neighborhood geek? I'd be willing to try it just to see if I could make it work. I love it when someone tells me it can't be done. It's a geek disease.
     
  11. Eck

    Eck .user

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  12. Taurus

    Taurus hardware monkey

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    :lol :D
     
  13. leedogg

    leedogg Gojyone kawaiiiiiiii!

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    I bent a pin once. The very first time i built my own pc, they used to put the amd chips inside these super sealed plastic shells and as I was struggling to get this thing open, it finally snaps open and my cpu and heart become airborn, the chip hits my sweater and glides down to land on the desk. I think everything is ok, but when I look at the cpu my heart plummets when I see one bent pin, I'm thinking its the end of the world and start rocking back and forth pulling hair out and wishing I had gotten a dell when some other guys in the lab tell me that its ok you can bend the damn things back. Fortunately all ends well...well aside from the incorrect system leds (one pin was in wrong - system wouldnt boot up), the defective new cd drive I had to rma, and the boot sector virus i got off the floppy disk while trying to resolve the faulty cd drive issue...

    ahhh my first pc. It was a good learning experience I'll put it that way ;)
     
  14. Black-Syth

    Black-Syth Comalies

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    God bless Slot 1, no pins to worry about. If the pin was broken off towards the edge, I'd say you've got a pretty smooth road ahead of you. I'd solder a nice, thin piece of metal about the size of the pin in it's place. Probably a wire or something. Good luck bud.
     
  15. grimman

    grimman Guest

    If you get it RMAed, you're insaaaaaaanely lucky.
     
  16. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

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    Yeah that's true. And especially at those clock speeds.
     
  17. Eck

    Eck .user

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    Called Intel, they're going to let me RMA it. :D
     
  18. adek

    adek Very xp-erianced

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    Humm Maybe intel aren't that tight fisted:eek:
     
  19. TheBlueRaja

    TheBlueRaja BR to Some

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    Woot!

    Good going Eck.

    *Mental note - never visit GoNzO's shop*

    :D
     
  20. GoNz0

    GoNz0 NTFS Stoner

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    :p not if you just admitted you fecked it up ;)

    it's twist then pull, not pull, push it back a bit then twist the lot LOL