Asus or MSI?

Discussion in 'Benchmarks & Performance' started by meth0d, Dec 2, 2005.

  1. meth0d

    meth0d OSNN One Post Wonder

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    Between Asis and MSI who would you say makes the better gamiung board?
     
  2. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

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  3. ming

    ming OSNN Advanced

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    In relation to that link you gave, kcnychief, what overclocking utilities is that person referring to for MSI?
    The MSI Neo4 Ultra has enough to keep most gamers happy with the OC facilities provided.
     
  4. Luna

    Luna OSNN Senior Addict Folding Team

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    My last three systems were all Asus, and I've never had any issues with their products. Never had a chance to use MSI.

    Asus does have good support for 64bit drivers and overclocking utilities which is a plus in my book.
     
  5. Steevo

    Steevo Spammer representing. Political User Folding Team

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    There is a stupid "Automatic OC feature" that uses commander, seargent, etc as different levels of OC. It stops at 11% OC FSB though. So it is virtually useless to a hardcore overclocker.

    They have a nice array of OC features though.

    CPU voltage.
    Nforce Voltage
    RAM voltage
    All by .05 steps

    FSB OCing well past what is sane for ANY CPU. I have mine at 235 from 200 and can take it up if I have the headroom.
    You can lock the PCIE bus and All other busses. Or you can overclock the PCIE interface to match what the FSB is and keep it in sync.

    As in.

    FSB = 220
    PCIE = 110

    All your memory timings are changeable, either up or down with a wide range on each. As well as being able to force a false speed on your RAM to make sure that it will be stable at speed. Up to and possibly past 250Mhz -- 500Mhz DDR for DDR400.


    So for me.

    4000+ 2.4 @ 2.88
    FSB 200 @ 235
    Core V 1.4 @ 1.65
    RAM V 2.5 @ 2.85
    Nforce v 1.50 @ 1.65
    RAM 2.2.2.5 @ 3.3.3.5 to achieve higher speeds with stability. I am still working on this to get it lower.

    There is also the equal to speed fan, you have a set of predefined temps to try and keep the CPU at. I have mine at 100% @ 102 F. Works well and is still quiet.
     
  6. Steevo

    Steevo Spammer representing. Political User Folding Team

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    Oh yeah, and it will-can ignore the multiplier.

    I have seen a few people drop the CPU multiplier to achieve higher FSB speeds and make up for it. I have as of yet to try this.
     
  7. zeke_mo

    zeke_mo (value not set) Staff Member Political User Folding Team

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    I have never had an MSI board before, but I have had 2 ASUS mobos in the last year or so and they both worked great
     
  8. 762x51

    762x51 168gr BTHP

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    MSI's quality control stinks. Out of my board, and the 2 Neo4 Platinums I have built for friends, all 3 boards have issues. My chipset fan died after 6 months of use, the 2 Neo4's kill CMOS battery's in 1-2 months time.

    My next board will be Asus or Abit. No more MSI stuff for me.
     
  9. NetRyder

    NetRyder Tech Junkie Folding Team

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    I'll vouch for the quality of ASUS boards too. My old desktop has the P3B-f and it's been running for 7 years now. My new desktop has a A8N-SLi Deluxe, but that's just about a month or two old. :)
     
  10. mlakrid

    mlakrid OSNN BASSMASTER Political User Folding Team

    I overclock mine to about 10% with no voltage bump required each and every time...

    So far...

    /Runs to knowck on wood....
     
  11. hazmatt87

    hazmatt87 OSNN Junior Addict

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    Dont forget about Abit either, im really happy with every one ive owned.
     
  12. mlakrid

    mlakrid OSNN BASSMASTER Political User Folding Team

    Yes but up until last year when Abit won several awards again for their mobos being a great OC'ing board for the pricepoint, their nicname was:
    ASH|+ not ABIT

    Their reliability track record SUCKS, sorry no other word for it
     
  13. Bootsy

    Bootsy Huh?

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    I have an MSI NEO4 Platinum and I love it, I used to have an ASUS A7N8X and the MSI has much more functionality and overclocking possibilities.

    Specs:
    Athlon 3800+ Dual Core 64bit
    MSI NEO4 Platinum
    OCZ low latency PC3200 ram - 1Gb
    GeForce 7800 GT
     
  14. klondikman88

    klondikman88 OSNN One Post Wonder

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    what about dfi...???
     
  15. Kush

    Kush High On Life!

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    asus, i prefer asus, and abit never heard of dfi, of course dont get me wrong msi is also a good brand, i just personally feel that asus is better quality
     
  16. Mainframeguy

    Mainframeguy Debiant by way of Ubuntu Folding Team

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    I have a Neo2 and the same ASUS board and can second this particular opinion
     
  17. mlakrid

    mlakrid OSNN BASSMASTER Political User Folding Team

    Lets not forget, every board has BIOS updates, and Asus is no different, many of the OC'ing issues for Asus have been fixed by their BIOS updates...

    :) Obviously I am biased towards Asus...
     
  18. 762x51

    762x51 168gr BTHP

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    My problem with MSI is not their functionality or feature set, but their quality control. I think their QA people are actually blind monkeys.
     
  19. mlakrid

    mlakrid OSNN BASSMASTER Political User Folding Team

    LOL for the last 3 years people were saying that about ABIT...

    Its all about who is in charge of the QA process within a company..
     
  20. Son Goku

    Son Goku No lover of dogma

    Actually the Athlon 64 ignores this because of CnQ. Given that the use of cool and quiet requires it to down clock the CPU, they couldn't multiplier lock it in the downward direction. CnQ is actually lowering the multiplier from what I have read, to down clock it. Needless to say, if OCing in this fashion, one should disable CnQ...

    As to mobos or any other product; my first piece of advise is to check the boards, reviews, etc... I'm not one who would swear by any company. For instance (though not mobos) I have a Plextor CD-RW 4/2/20 (the first RW drive they ever made in my comp) and after 7 years it still works and no signs of dieing. I've known peeps with Plextor drives and similar success...

    However, more recently I've heard some say "their drives used to be good, but now we've had X number of drives all fail at work, in various different comps around the building, with a variety of dif model drives". I can't confirm this, or deny it (as my experience is with their older model drives), but it wouldn't entirely surprise me. S3 used be a good graphics card company :rofl before the fiasco that was known as the Virge decelerator, and back in the day of 2D only gfx cards. It happens.

    I've had several Asus boards in the past, and even put one in a computer I rebuilt for my father. All with good success until my last mobo. Namely the Asus A7N266-E based on the nForce 1 chipset. Some might remember threads from earlier in the year when I was having comp problems (say 9 months or so ago). This ranged for awhile, and the mobo was dieing. It started going bad about 1.5 years ago, and the board was bought in March 2003 or so. From the fan dieing, to not booting, losing AGP, USB devices at times, and other issues...it is the main reason I upgraded to an A64 now, even though as a college graduate now, my money situation isn't that great.

    I've had others say (even some shops that swear by and almost only sell Asus, as well as Gigabyte boards) that, that particular model had proved problematic for them and many of their customers. (I hadn't gotten the board from that shop, but it does tell a bit.)

    Any company can have a exceptionally good or bad product one go around, and in the end name alone doesn't mean the board is necessarily going to be a given quality. Though a companies history can say a bit, things can always change, and one given model can also be the exception, rather then the rule for them.

    I've got an MSI board now, but it is the first I've tried, so not much to compare it on. But my advise is to determine the platform you want (aka Intel or AMD), the CPU type, and which socket it uses. Then select a chipset, perhaps look at what you need in terms of expansion slots. Once this is done, check the offerings; and then get online and check to see what others customer experiences have been before plopping the cash down with anyone...
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2005
    Mainframeguy likes this.