any Network Admins?

Discussion in 'Windows Desktop Systems' started by Dlovely, Jul 7, 2002.

  1. Dlovely

    Dlovely Guest

    Im currently working as a desktop support fella at a pharmaceutical company HQ's. anyway my question is, how did you become a Network Admin, i.e. school etc... and if you have any pointers,stories, or suggestions on becoming one because after 2.5yrs in desktop support, i about had it and need to further my career and bank account. any help would be appreciated :)
  2. Reg

    Reg eXperienced!

    Arlington, TX
    Here's what I did...

    My first step into becoming a network admin was to learn about networks. More specifically, SOHO and Enterprise networks. Most of my skills were aquired by figuring things out on my own... but here are somethings to get you started:

    CCNA - Cisco Certified Networking Associate - This certification is the entry level certification for Cisco Systems and a good way to begin a networking career. After finishing the 4 module course, you will have the basic skills required to manage and deploy a good network. Most people who obtain this certificate start out as Network Support Specialist and can earn anywhere from $40,000 - $70,000 depending on your skills and the company.

    Most CCNA's continue their studies to earn their CCNP, CCDA, CCDP, and even the CCIE, to further their knowledge and bank account.

    CNE - Certified Novel Engineer - Although you will learn about Novell and how to use it if you take the CCNA courses, it's not a bad idea to get the certification

    MCSE - Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer - A real good certification to get if you are working with Windows Server networks.

    As for costs, those courses can cost quite a bit. Fortunate for me, I took mine in High School for free!
  3. JJB6486

    JJB6486 Retired Mod Political User

    West Lafayette, IN, USA
    I'm not there, but working on it (still in high school)

    Hope to take this summer:
    CompTIA A+ Core Hardware/Operating Systems
    CompTIA Network+

    Will take next year (after HS elective course in the material):
    Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA)

    Few Years Down The Road:
    Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE)
    College Computer Engineering Degree (I definitly want to go to 4-year college regardless of how great a job offer i get right out of HS)
  4. Dlovely

    Dlovely Guest

    in high school? lmao im friggin 27 and now i feel really old and behind the times but hey hats off to ya for being able to do that.
    I have an A+ cert but was planning on doing the MCSA, i get reimbursed for tests only, not courses because im technically a contractor. then i considered going for the MCSE eventually after the MCSA. CCNA i heard is hard as hell and being that i dont have much "network" experience other than connectivity stuff and the simple stuff, im wondering how difficult the CCNA will be.
    Im just wondering if i'll learn enough from cert classes to be effective on the job or should i go back to school? its so confusing on which route to take or where to go ugh!
  5. Reg

    Reg eXperienced!

    Arlington, TX
    First to JJB6486... Amem to college. I just finished HS and am in college majoring in Aviation Computer Engineering. Go for Engineering... While I do work as a network admin, I'm a full time student (since my job allows me to work from remote. I only go in when things happen).

    As for the CCNA, it wasn't hard at all... for me at least. It took me 7 months to complete all 4 modules and get my CCNA. Some people take less, some take longer. It depends on your instructor, the school, and how well you understand the information. One good thing about Cisco is that once you begin or complete a module (called Semesters by Cisco), you will always have access to the most up to date curriculum for that module. This way, you always have something to fall back on. Since I completed all 4 modules, I have access to the most up to date versions of them. Once I start my CCNP, it will be the same way.

    As for your age, in computer terms, you are sort of old. A lot of schools offer these courses as electives. My advice is to jump in now why your mind is still fresh. There is a lot of information to cover out there and getting a good grasp of it in your latter years is hard.