another page file thread

Discussion in 'Windows Desktop Systems' started by Perris Calderon, Jul 9, 2002.

  1. Perris Calderon

    Perris Calderon Moderator Staff Member Political User

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    ok, according to this white paper, (cudos to allan for showing this to me),microsoft says, that fragmentation can occur in your page file, if the page file is constantly resizing....now, for this white paper, I will again adjust my advice on the page file...preciously, I advocated the default, which is 1.5 of ram, with full expansion enabled...presently, I'm now recomending the page file be set to a minimum of 2x ram...you must leave expansion enabled, so if xp does need a bigger file, it will be available, but we are trying to avoid ecpansion by raising the standard.

    you must not set the page to static, as your programs will freeze or crash if xp needs a bigger file, therefore, you are trying to set the page file to a value that will be big enough, that your os does not need to resize.

    Let me state again...I have forced pf resizing in order to moniter fragmentation, it is not present on my box once I reboot, so I think the white paper is possibly wrong, however, in case it's not, make sure you set the page file to a high enough value...for most that's 1.5. but for me it's higher.


    here's a qoute from the white paper...;

    ...The optimal solution is to create one paging file that is, by default, stored on the boot partition, and then create one paging file on another, less frequently accessed partition. Additionally, it is optimal to create the second paging file so that it exists on its own partition, with no data or operating-system-specific files. By design, Windows uses the paging file on the less frequently accessed partition over the paging file on the more heavily accessed boot partition. An internal algorithm is used to determine which paging file to use for virtual memory management.

    When you place a paging file on its own partition, the paging file does not become fragmented, and this counts as another definite advantage. If a paging file resides on a partition that contains other data, it may experience fragmentation as it expands to satisfy the extra virtual memory that is required. An unfragmented paging file leads to faster virtual memory access and greater likelihood of a dump-file capture that is free of significant errors.

    If you follow the preceding recommendations, you meet the following paging file configuration goals for optimization and recovery: ...
    end qoute


    obviously, you need to leave expansion enabled, but try to have the size of it large onough, where resizing does not occur.

    further, when you do resize the file, make sure you use the proggy I posted on "free programs" to defrag the pf...then your set
     
  2. Perris Calderon

    Perris Calderon Moderator Staff Member Political User

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    ok...I've done some research on what the white paper says, and here's what's actually going on.

    IF YOUR PF IS CONSTANTLY resizing, then of course, the area that it resizes to is fragged, but ONLY DURING THE RESIZE, and not on reboot..therefore, you obviously need a bigger default on your pf, BUT DON'T DISSABLE EXPANSION...you still want a bigger page file if xp needs it.
     
  3. 2z

    2z OSNN Gamer

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    Hi Dealer
    What did you use to test the page file ????
    My first experience of XP runnuning out of virtual memory was using a program called Ordix Interactive Mpack Professional v4.00 to join two 750meg AVI. files, it took 15mins to create the extra space. I then changed the settings to let windows manage my page file & tried again - the same thing happened.
    Wasn't until I created a fixed Page file of 2gig the operation would run smoothly. It really does depend on what software you run on your machine as to the correct size of the initial page file. I think a fixed page file is fine as long as its well above your software requirments, & youv'e got the space for it.
     
  4. Perris Calderon

    Perris Calderon Moderator Staff Member Political User

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    very good...I launched a bunch of animation programs, plus for some reason, Eudora is a bear to load on my box...anyway, your solution is fine, as you created such a monster page file, expansion would never occur.

    A better idea, is to go ahead and make the minimum page file 2 gigs, yet leave expansion enabled to the full available volume.


    In this case, it should be impossible to eve get to the point of expansion, but don't forget, programmers write programs according to the available tehnology...pretty soon, there'll be proggys that'll tax your 2 gig file also, you don't want to constrain the os...here's the solution...

    make the minimum of the file so big, it's inconceivable that expansion will occur...leave expansion enabled, if the time comes that expansion ever does occur, then increase the minimum of the page file...

    how's that sound?
     
  5. 2z

    2z OSNN Gamer

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    :D Sweet.
    Dealer your a star
    ;)
     
  6. 2z

    2z OSNN Gamer

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  7. 2z

    2z OSNN Gamer

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    A defragmented page file will fragment as it grows if it is surrounded by data and has no where to expand to. Defrag your files regularly.
     
  8. 2z

    2z OSNN Gamer

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    To move your page file into more open space, make it a fixed size page file at least double your initial size this will force the page file to be created in more open space, now resize the page file to its original size & it should of kept its new position on the disk.
     
  9. 2z

    2z OSNN Gamer

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    Creating a partition specifically for the page file. I recommended using FAT16 for this partition being the least compressed it is the quickest & leave at least 100meg free disk space – XP will complain if you fill it. So make it a fixed page file - min & max same value.
     
  10. 2z

    2z OSNN Gamer

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    If you’ve got 2 x HDD no harm in having two page file partitions one on each disk, and a dynamic page file on your boot drive.
     
  11. Perris Calderon

    Perris Calderon Moderator Staff Member Political User

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    actually, you will almost definately get faster performance with two page files, on two discs if they're both the same speed...this may even be true if one hard drive is slower then the other...here's a qoute from the microsoft knowledge base;

    You can place a paging file on other disk drives. If you have multiple hard disks, splitting up the paging file is a good idea because it will speed up the access time. If you have two hard disks and you split the paging file, both hard disks can be accessing information simultaneously, greatly increasing the throughput. However, if you have two hard disks and one hard disk is faster than the other, it might be more effective to store the paging file only on the faster hard disk. You might need to experiment to arrive at the best configuration for your system.