A question about mp3

Discussion in 'Windows Desktop Systems' started by brintonwhite, Feb 22, 2003.

  1. brintonwhite

    brintonwhite Guest

    If I insert an audio cd and want to copy a song from it and turn into an mp3 can this be done? I am new to computers so a step by step instruction would be very welcome.

    Thank you
     
  2. DFX

    DFX OSNN Senior Addict

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    OK, aslong as its not a copyright protected CD this will work:

    Download CDex from http://cdexos.sourceforge.net/download.php

    There are other, and some better, programs to do it, but this is the easiest methinks. Go to options, make sure your using LAME MP3 codec and 192kbps.

    It should just be as easy as inserting a CD after changing the settings, then selecting the track you want and then pressing the MP3 button (as oppose to the WAV one).

    Let me know how you get on.
     
  3. brintonwhite

    brintonwhite Guest

    help

    I can't understand this at all. I downloaded the zip bundle and it's downloaded ok. I've gone to help and it may as well be written in chinese. Do I need to download the exe as well?

    Thanks
     
  4. brintonwhite

    brintonwhite Guest

    DFX

    Thanks. It's ok. I think I have sorted out how to use it.
     
  5. sboulema

    sboulema Moderator

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  6. lechtard

    lechtard Guest

    You could also use EAC .. IT's a little bit difficult to set up for a newbie though .. there web page has a lot of tutorials on it ..

    There are a lot of files out there - you just have to do a serach for them .. but in anycase CDex and EAC are the best choices . .

    Then if you happen to have Easy CD Creator 6 you can use it also .. just open the audio central and at the top select tools/options, then select emcoding, select the bitrate - 192 is the best, then select general and put a check in automatically look up cd info, then select apply, then select o.k ..

    After you did that put the cd in ,, when they show up in the window just check them all and at the bottom you will see a book with an arrow going into it, it's the second one in from the left .. select that and it will encode it to your my music folder ...

    This dose'nt use lame, but the sound aulity is faitly good ..

    Hope this helps .. it's quite easy once you do a couple of them ..

    when nero 6 comes out it is suppost to have the same option ... I can't wait for this :D
     
  7. Nick M

    Nick M Moderator

    Messages:
    3,961
    First of all, hey there Britonwhite :)

    Use EAC. Here it a tutorial on how to rip mp3s, it's quite easy, and there isn't a hassle at all :)

    Taken from another site and not by me

    --=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

    1. Go to http://www.exactaudiocopy.de/ and download the newest beta of Exact Audio Copy. This is THE best ripping program available.

    2. Go to http://mitiok.cjb.net/ and download the lastest stable build of LAME MP3 Encoder. This is arguably the best encoder out there for MP3. It's the one I like the best.

    3. Install Exact Audio Copy, make note of the directory that it installs the files to, you'll have to go there in the next step.

    4. Unzip the LAME file that you downloaded. Pluck out the lame_enc.dll and move it to the directory where Exact Audio Copy installed to.

    5. Launch EAC. Go through the little wizard it presents about your CD-ROM drive. Do NOT setup LAME as an external decoder.

    6. Go to EAC in the toolbar, then Compression Options, and under the Waveform tab select Wave format as LAME MPEG Layer-3 Encoder v3.93 DLL v1.32

    7. Choose the Sample format that you want. *I* use Minimum 192kBit/s VBR, 44,100Hz, Stereo. The files are a little bigger than usual, but it makes up in sound quality. For playing back on your home stereo or good speaker system on your computer, I'd highly recommend this format. For portable players, you might want to choose 128kBit/s or even lower. Drive space is cheap these days

    8. Check the box "Add ID3 tag" and "Do not write WAV header to file" and in the "File extension for headerless files" type .mp3 Nick: This is important, if you miss this, the file will be a WAV.

    9. Under the ID3 Tag tab, change the "Construction of filenames from ID3 tags" to whatever you want. Just follow the instructions.

    10. Pop in a CD, click the CD button right above where the tracknames would be and that will go to the internet and get all the tracknames and stuff.

    11. Click the MP3 to your left and go get a drink.

    12. Enjoy!
     
  8. shulse

    shulse Guest

    Here is a question to anyone on here -

    I keep saying that everyone is suggesting the burn to be at 192 kbs, and that is the best quality. I thought 320 kbs was the best and a direct duplication of the original cd recording?

    Set me straight people!
     
  9. Nick M

    Nick M Moderator

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    3,961
    320 is the best most codecs can go, and is near if not CD quality itself. Takes up space though....I rip at 320, high quality tunes.
     
  10. dreamliner77

    dreamliner77 The Analog Kid

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  11. mbunny

    mbunny Guest

    320kbps rips... aren't we being a tad anal?

    256kbps is the CD Quality bitrate. However, to us mere humans we can't tell the difference between 192 and 256 let alone 192 and 320kbps. (Well some of the more well trained ears can but thats assuming everything is at optimal condititions, and unless you have THX quality speakers or at least some mid range Seinheissers.... don't bother)

    192kbps VBR is the be all and end all bitrate for mp3. (With LAME of course) It compensates for silent/less technical parts of the song and it also compensates for the more technical parts of music by increasing the bitrate even till 320kbps with 192kbps being the median bitrate of the song.

    However, if you are true audiophile you won't even deal with lossy compression schemes and would probably go for Monkey Audio which is easist described as being WinZip for WAVE files. Its a true copy and doesn't lose any information. Of course it compresses better than WinZip does =P

    And of course, theres the people who like to advocate WMA. So WMA is user friendly with it being available with WMP. The problem is, WMA has a very tinny quality to it. Compare a WMA with a decent Lame MP3 or Ogg Vorbis and you will hear it.

    Ogg Vorbis imho is the winner out of all these formats. It compresses at a better ratio so you get higher quality sound at the same bitrate. Its open source and will never require money for it. The all wise Fraunhaufer is starting to claim royalities on mp3 players in all shapes and sizes. This may mean we will be playing mp3's only on WMP if AOL decide it doesn't want to fork out more money for WinAmp.

    Microsoft in its wisdom will not allow its codec to be ported to any other platform other than windows. Anyone else also have a copy protected WMA that doesn't play anymore since they formatted?

    Ogg Vorbis is supported on ALL platforms. Linux, Macintosh, Windows, Unix and even OS/2 lol. And due to its open source nature, money will not be charged for it. Well... ain't this a kick in the ass.

    Ogg Vorbis quality setting 6 = Ultimate (btw... Quality Setting 6 = 192kbps VBR)

    www.vorbis.com
     
  12. lechtard

    lechtard Guest

    You can also have "Extreme Settings" - What this does is fluctuate the bitrate - it takes out all the low low frequencies and cuts the blank spaces during a song out making the file smaller and more clear .. I found in some cases you can tell tle the diff in the fluctuation while listening to the song ..