9-11 Poem

Discussion in 'Green Room' started by Daviesbad04, Jun 23, 2002.

  1. Daviesbad04

    Daviesbad04 Guest

    > >Her hair was up in a ponytail Her favorite dress tied with a bow.
    Today
    >was
    > >Daddy's Day at school, And she couldn't wait to go.
    > >But her mommy tried to tell her, That she probably should stay home.
    Why
    >the
    > >kids might not understand, If she went to school alone.
    > >But she was not afraid; She knew just what to say. What to tell her
    > >classmates Of why he wasn't there today.
    > >But still her mother worried, For her to face this day alone. And
    that
    >was
    > >why once again, She tried to keep her daughter home.
    > >But the little girl went to school, Eager to tell them all. About a
    dad
    >she
    > >never sees A dad who never calls.
    > >There were daddies along the wall in back, For everyone to meet.
    Children
    > >squirming impatiently, Anxious in their seats.
    > >One by one the teacher called, A student from the class. To
    introduce

    >their
    > >daddy, As seconds slowly passed.
    > >At last the teacher called her name, Every child turned to stare.
    Each of
    > >them was searching, For a man who wasn't there.
    > >"Where's her daddy at?" She heard a boy call out. "She probably
    doesn't
    >have
    > >one," Another student dared to shout.
    > >And from somewhere near the back, She heard a daddy say, Looks like
    >another
    > >deadbeat dad, Too busy to waste his day."
    > >The words did not offend her, As she smiled up at her Mom. And
    looked

    >back
    > >at her teacher, Who told her to go on.
    > >And with hands behind her back, Slowly she began to speak. And out
    from
    >the
    > >mouth of a child, Came words incredibly unique.
    > >"My Daddy couldn't be here, Because he lives so far away. But I know
    he
    > >wishes he could be, Since this is such a special day.
    > >And though you cannot meet him, I wanted you to know. All about my
    daddy,
    > >And how much he loves me so.
    > >He loved to tell me stories He taught me to ride my bike. He
    surprised me
    > >with pink roses, And taught me to fly a kite.
    > >We used to share fudge sundaes, And ice cream in a cone. And though
    you
    > >cannot see him, I'm not standing here alone.
    > >"Cause my daddy's always with me, Even though we are apart I know
    because
    >he
    > >told me, He'll forever be in my heart"
    > >With that, her little hand reached up, And lay across her chest.
    Feeling
    >her
    > >own heartbeat, Beneath her favorite dress.
    > >And from somewhere in the crowd of dads, Her mother stood in tears.
    >Proudly
    > >watching her daughter, Who was wise beyond her years.
    > >For she stood up for the love Of a man not in her life. Doing what
    was
    >best
    > >for her, Doing what was right.
    > >And when she dropped her hand back down, Staring straight into the
    crowd.
    > >She finished with a voice so soft, But its message clear and loud.
    > >"I love my daddy very much, He's my shining star. And if he could,
    he'd
    >be
    > >here, But heaven's just too far.
    > >You see he was a fireman And died just this past year When airplanes
    hit
    >the
    > >towers And taught Americans to fear.
    > >But sometimes when I close my eyes, It's like he never went away."
    And
    >then
    > >she closed her eyes, And saw him there that day.
    > >And to her mother's amazement, She witnessed with surprise. A room
    full
    >of
    > >daddies and children, All starting to close their eyes.
    > >Who knows what they saw before them, Who knows what they felt
    inside.
    > >Perhaps for merely a second, They saw him at her side.
    > >"I know you're with me Daddy," To the silence she called out. And
    what
    > >happened next made believers, Of those once filled with doubt.
    > >Not one in that room could explain it, For each of their eyes had
    been
    > >closed. But there on the desk beside her, Was a fragrant
    long-stemmed

    >pink
    > >rose.
    > >And a child was blessed, if only for a moment, By the love of her
    shining
    > >bright star. And given the gift of believing, That heaven is never
    too
    >far
    > >They say it takes a minute to find a special person, an hour to
    >appreciate
    > >them, a day to love them, but then an entire life to forget them.



    I think this is a wonderful poem, it almost made me cry:(

    Tell me what you think of it:)
     
  2. Electronic Punk

    Electronic Punk Administrator Staff Member Political User Folding Team

    Messages:
    18,590
    Location:
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Thats nice, and wouldn't suprise me if it was a true story..
     
  3. Gary Pandher

    Gary Pandher Moderator

    Messages:
    884
    yea
    its really nice
    touching
     
  4. ikester7579

    ikester7579 Guest

    That was great!
     
  5. ikester7579

    ikester7579 Guest

    Here's another one. Does not have anything to do with 9-11 but it's sweet because it's also about a child.


    > > This is a little Long but a wonderful story :)
    > >
    > > A Father's Story
    > >
    > >
    > > On July 22nd I was en route to Washington, DC for a
    > > business trip. It
    > > was all so very ordinary, until landing in Denver
    > > for a plane change. As
    > > I collected my belongings from the overhead bin, an
    > > announcement was made
    > > for Mr. Lloyd Glenn to see the United Customer
    > > Service Representative
    > > immediately.
    > >
    > > I thought nothing of it until I reached the door to
    > > leave the plane, and
    > > I heard a gentleman asking every male if they were
    > > Mr.Glenn. At this
    > > point I knew something was wrong and my heart sunk.
    > >
    > > When I got off the plane a solemn-faced young man
    > > came toward me and
    > > said, "Mr. Glenn, there is an emergency at your
    > > home. I do not know
    > > what the emergency is, or who is involved, but I
    > > will take you to the
    > > phone so you can call the hospital." My heart was
    > > now pounding, but the
    > > will to be calm took over.
    > >
    > > Woodenly, I followed this stranger to the distant
    > > telephone where I
    > > called the number he gave me for the Mission
    > > Hospital. My call was put
    > > through to the trauma center where I learned that my
    > > three-year-old son
    > > had been trapped underneath the automatic garage
    > > door for several
    > > minutes, and that when my wife had found him he was
    > > dead.
    > >
    > > A neighbor, who is a doctor, had performed CPR and
    > > the paramedics had
    > > continued the treatment as Brian was transported to
    > > the hospital. By the
    > > time of my call, Brian was revived and they believed
    > > he would live, but
    > > they did not know how much damage had been done to
    > > his brain, nor to his
    > > heart.
    > >
    > > They explained that the door had completely closed
    > > on his little sternum
    > > right over his heart. He had been severely crushed.
    > > After speaking with
    > > the medical staff, my wife sounded worried but not
    > > hysterical, and I took
    > > comfort in her calmness.
    > >
    > > The return flight seemed to last forever, but
    > > finally I arrived at the
    > > hospital six hours after the garage door had come
    > > down.
    > >
    > > When I walked into the intensive care unit, nothing
    > > could have prepared
    > > me to see my little son laying so still on a great
    > > big bed with tubes and
    > > monitors everywhere.
    > >
    > > He was on a respirator.
    > >
    > > I glanced at my wife who stood and tried to give me
    > > a reassuring smile.
    > > It all seemed like a terrible dream.
    > >
    > > I was filled-in with the details and given a guarded
    > > prognosis. Brian was
    > > going to live, and the preliminary tests indicated
    > > that his heart was OK,
    > > two miracles in and of themselves.
    > >
    > > But only time would tell if his brain received any
    > > damage. Throughout
    > > the seemingly endless hours, my wife was calm. She
    > > felt that Brian would
    > > eventually be all right. I hung on to her words and
    > > faith like a
    > > lifeline.
    > >
    > > All that night and the next day Brian remained
    > > unconscious. It seemed
    > > like forever since I had left for my business trip
    > > the day before.
    > > Finally at two o'clock that afternoon, our son
    > > regained consciousness and
    > > sat up uttering the most beautiful words I have ever
    > > heard spoken.
    > >
    > > He said,"Daddy hold me" and he reached for me with
    > > his little arms.
    > > [TEAR BREAK...smile]
    > >
    > > By the next day he was pronounced as having no
    > > neurological or physical
    > > deficits, and the story of his miraculous survival
    > > spread throughout the
    > > hospital.
    > >
    > > You cannot imagine when we took Brian home; we felt
    > > a unique reverence
    > > for the life and love of our Heavenly Father that
    > > comes to those who
    > > brush death so closely.
    > >
    > > In the days that followed there was a special spirit
    > > about our home. Our
    > > two older children were much closer to their little
    > > brother.
    > >
    > > My wife and I were much closer to each other, and
    > > all of us were very
    > > close as a whole
    > > family. Life took on a less stressful pace.
    > > Perspective seemed to be
    > > more focused, and balance much easier to gain and
    > > maintain. We felt
    > > deeply blessed. Our gratitude was truly profound.
    > >
    > > The story is not over (smile)!
    > >
    > > Almost a month later to the day of the accident,
    > > Brian awoke from his
    > > afternoon nap and said, "Sit down Mommy. I have
    > > something to tell you."
    > >
    > >
    > > At this time in his life, Brian usually spoke in
    > > small phrases, so to say
    > > a large sentence surprised my wife.
    > >
    > > She sat down with him on his bed, and he began his
    > > sacred and remarkable
    > > story.
    > >
    > > "Do you remember when I got stuck under the garage
    > > door? Well, it was
    > > so heavy and it hurt really bad. I called to you,
    > > but you couldn't hear
    > > me. I started to cry, but then it hurt too bad.
    > > And then the 'birdies'
    > > came."
    > >
    > > "The birdies?" my wife asked puzzled.
    > >
    > >
    > > "Yes," he replied.
    > >
    > > "The birdies made a whooshing sound and flew into
    > > the garage. They took
    > > care of me."
    > >
    > > "They did?"
    > >
    > > "Yes," he said. "one of the birdies came and got
    > > you. She came to
    > > tell you I got stuck under the door."
    > >
    > > A sweet reverent feeling filled the room. The
    > > spirit was so strong and
    > > yet lighter than air.
    > >
    > > My wife realized that a three-year-old had no
    > > concept of death and
    > > spirits, so he was referring to the beings who came
    > > to him from beyond as
    > > "birdies" because they were up in the air like birds
    > > that fly.
    > >
    > > "What did the birdies look like?" she asked.
    > >
    > > Brian answered, "They were so beautiful. They were
    > > dressed in white,
    > > all white. Some of them had green and white. But
    > > some of them had on
    > > just white."
    > >
    > > "Did they say anything?"
    > >
    > > "Yes," he answered. "They told me the baby would be
    > > all right."
    > >
    > > "The baby?" my wife asked confused.
    > >
    > > Brian answered. "The baby laying on the garage
    > > floor." He went on, You
    > > came out and opened the garage door and ran to the
    > > baby. You told the
    > > baby to stay and not leave."
    > >
    > > My wife nearly collapsed upon hearing this, for she
    > > had indeed gone and
    > > knelt beside Brian's body and seeing his crushed
    > > chest whispered, "Don't
    > > leave us Brian, please stay if you can."
    > >
    > > As she listened to Brian telling her the words she
    > > had spoken, she
    > > realized that the spirit had left his body and was
    > > looking down from
    > > above on this little lifeless form. "Then what
    > > happened?" she asked.
    > >
    > > "We went on a trip." he said, "Far, far away." He
    > > grew agitated trying
    > > to say the things he didn't seem to have the words
    > > for.
    > >
    > > My wife tried to calm and comfort him, and let him
    > > know it would be okay.
    > >
    > > He struggled with wanting to tell something that
    > > obviously was very
    > > important to him, but finding the words was
    > > difficult. "We flew so fast
    > > up in the air. They're so pretty Mommy," he added.
    > > "And there are lots
    > > and lots of birdies."
    > >
    > > My wife was stunned. Into her mind the sweet
    > > comforting spirit
    > > enveloped her more soundly, but with an urgency she
    > > had never before
    > > known.
    > >
    > > Brian went on to tell her that the "birdies" had
    > > told him that he had to
    > > come back and tell everyone about the "birdies." He
    > > said they brought
    > > him back to the house and that a big fire truck and
    > > an ambulance were
    > > there. A man was bringing the baby out on a white
    > > bed and he tried to
    > > tell the man that the baby would be okay, but the
    > > man couldn't hear him.
    > > He said the birdies told him he had to go with the
    > > ambulance, but they
    > > would be near him. He said they were so pretty and
    > > so peaceful, and he
    > > didn't want to come back.
    > >
    > > Then the bright light came. He said that the light
    > > was so bright and so
    > > warm, and he loved the bright light so much. Someone
    > > was in the bright
    > > light and put their arms around him, and told him,
    > > "I love you but you
    > > have to go back. You have to play baseball, and
    > > tell everyone about the
    > > birdies."
    > >
    > > Then the person in the bright light kissed him and
    > > waved bye-bye.
    > >
    > > Then woosh, the big sound came and they went into
    > > the clouds.
    > >
    > > The story went on for an hour.
    > >
    > > He taught us that "birdies" were always with us, but
    > > we don't see them
    > > because we look with our eyes and we don't hear them
    > > because we listen
    > > with our ears. But they are always there, you can
    > > only see them in here
    > > (he put his hand over his heart).
    > >
    > > They whisper the things to help us to do what is
    > > right because they love
    > > us so much.
    > >
    > > Brian continued, stating, "I have a plan, Mommy.
    > > You have a plan.
    > > Daddy has a plan. Everyone has a plan. We must
    > > all live our plan and
    > > keep our promises. The birdies help us to do that
    > > cause they love us so
    > > much."
    > >
    > > In the weeks that followed, he often came to us and
    > > told all or part of
    > > it, again and again.
    > >
    > > Always the story remained the same. The details
    > > were never changed or
    > > out of order.
    > >
    > > A few times he added further habits of information
    > > and clarified the
    > > message he had already delivered.
    > >
    > > It never ceased to amaze us how he could tell such
    > > detail and speak
    > > beyond his ability when he talked about his birdies.
    > > Everywhere he
    > > went, he told strangers about the "birdies."
    > > Surprisingly, no one ever
    > > looked at him strangely when he did this. Rather,
    > > they always got a
    > > softened look on their face and smiled.
    > >
    > > Needless to say, we have not been the same ever
    > > since that day, and I
    > > pray we never will be.