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Upgrade using full OEM disk?

ray_gillespie

OSNN Veteran Addict
Political User
#5
As far as I know, OEM discs can only be used for a fresh install. Certainly Win98 OEM discs couldn't be used for an upgrade. You may need to wipe your hard disk or install clean on a new one to use it.
 

American Zombie

Administrator
Staff member
Political User
#6
To use the upgrade option you have to run the DVD from within Windows. When you boot from the DVD the option to upgrade will be disabled.
 
#7
NOT SO FAST!

You can only do an upgarde install. i.e. Place Vista (or XP) over an existing install if it is a true upgrade.

The link shows a copy of Vista Home. You will not be able to install Vista Home over XP Pro or XP Corp. That is a downgrade not an upgrade and requires a wipe and new install.

If it is Vista Home over XP Home that should work.

Be adviced there is much controversy over what you will be allowed to do with OEM copies of Vista over the long term because of restrictive liscense terms. Right now MS is treating it as wide open and there are no limitiations on OEM (or system builder) versions vs the full retail versions.
 

Tweakfiend

OSNN Senior Addict
#8
As far as I know, OEM discs can only be used for a fresh install. Certainly Win98 OEM discs couldn't be used for an upgrade. You may need to wipe your hard disk or install clean on a new one to use it.
Incorrect Ray , It is as I previously mentioned , the instructions leaflet with the disc are quite clear & specific on upgrades and installations. The upgrade method is from within windows and is not greyed out.
The standalone installation for dual booting I have already done.
Other people will have the MSoft booklet with the DVD to confirm this.
 
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fitz

Woah.. I'm still here?
Staff member
Political User
#9
Be adviced there is much controversy over what you will be allowed to do with OEM copies of Vista over the long term because of restrictive liscense terms. Right now MS is treating it as wide open and there are no limitiations on OEM (or system builder) versions vs the full retail versions.
There is no controversy.

Microsoft licensing terms specifically state that at OEM license is bound to a single machine. You can wipe and reload it on that same machine any number of times. You are not allowed to uninstall it from one computer and install it on a different computer. Now, there is a slight "grey area" as to what consists of a new computer - ie: if I upgrade the motherboard, cpu, and GPU, is it a new machine just in the same case?

note, I say "not allowed" and not, you "can't". You "can" in the sense that you can take the disk and start it on a another computer and install and it will work fine - you just aren't allowed to according to the license terms of the OEM license.

Retail copies are allowed to run a single instace and can be transferred from machine to machine (as long as the previous copy is removed).

These terms were the same for XP as well (and windows 2000 for that matter).
 

ray_gillespie

OSNN Veteran Addict
Political User
#10
So you can upgrade an installation of XP home with an OEM Vista disc? When was that allowed? I definitely remember not being able to upgrade using Windows 98 OEM discs.

Pretty cool though.

Incorrect Ray , It is as I previously mentioned , the instructions leaflet with the disc are quite clear & specific on upgrades and installations. The upgrade method is from within windows and is not greyed out.
The standalone installation for dual booting I have already done.
Other people will have the MSoft booklet with the DVD to confirm this.
 

Tweakfiend

OSNN Senior Addict
#11
So you can upgrade an installation of XP home with an OEM Vista disc? When was that allowed? I definitely remember not being able to upgrade using Windows 98 OEM discs.

Pretty cool though.
Yes its true, that Vista unexpectedly changed the rules on this.
I did investigate to make sure before buying.

Reinstalls on same PC with new upgrade parts should be OK but not a tfr registration to a new PC.
Should be able to get a new code via Microsoft phone call when no of acceptable reinstalls exceeded , or new hardware added.
So as fitz mentioned... what constitutes a new PC maybe a grey area.
 

madmatt

Bow Down to the King
Political User
#12
The way Microsoft sees it is that you don't change components on an OEM built computer (e.g. Dell) so it isn't a "gray area" when dealing with OEM installation discs.
 

Tweakfiend

OSNN Senior Addict
#13
The way Microsoft sees it is that you don't change components on an OEM built computer (e.g. Dell) so it isn't a "gray area" when dealing with OEM installation discs.
Yes ... But OEMs should really only be sold with complete systems or with accompanying hardware item(s) purchased. ( in the UK at least.)

However this pre condition ,although maybe not sanctioned by Microsoft, has it seems been relaxed by many retailers.
 
#16
It is my belief that an OEM copy of Vista can be installed as a dual boot with XP, stand alone or whatever you may require but you get no official support from Microsoft help. Even an upgrade (any version of Vista) will install without reference to anything providing you install it clean without activating it, then re-install it again (over itself) as an upgrade, as Vista “don’t” check for such things by design. This is a clear violation of the EULA but then again who wrote the thing in the first place?

Microsoft designed it like this deliberately so do a clean install (using the upgrade version of vista and save the OEM version or XP for anther machine) otherwise your old version of XP (if you use the standard upgrade install) will leave you one XP licence adrift and a few bucks out of pocket.

:) :) :)
 

Tweakfiend

OSNN Senior Addict
#17
Yes.... I think most people who install systems regularly allow for these eventualities.
I use the principal of loading both systems in parallel , migrate all sofware possible to Vista then at a later stage decide if/when to cut adrift from XP.
At the moment I have a few programs that will not run on Vista ,including games that have a costly reactivation requirement.
I always buy OEMs as an economic cost trade off, retail is always better where possible.
Microsoft have set the exchange rate cost of Vista at approx 1.4 $ to £ which has resulted in this workaround issue, IMO


It is my belief that an OEM copy of Vista can be installed as a dual boot with XP, stand alone or whatever you may require but you get no official support from Microsoft help. Even an upgrade (any version of Vista) will install without reference to anything providing you install it clean without activating it, then re-install it again (over itself) as an upgrade, as Vista “don’t” check for such things by design. This is a clear violation of the EULA but then again who wrote the thing in the first place?

Microsoft designed it like this deliberately so do a clean install (using the upgrade version of vista and save the OEM version or XP for anther machine) otherwise your old version of XP (if you use the standard upgrade install) will leave you one XP licence adrift and a few bucks out of pocket.

:) :) :)
 
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