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need to clock laptop down while on juice

Perris Calderon

Moderator
Staff member
Political User
#1
I guess one or both of the fans stopped working...laptop doesn't overheat on batteries when it's clocked down but it does when on ac

any ideas how to get it to run at the slower clock speed while plugged in?
 

Admiral Michael

Michaelsoft Systems CEO
#2
Unlike previous versions of Windows, XP has native support for processor performance control. The operating system has built-in support for Intel SpeedStep and AMD PowerNow! Thus, the applets previously required for use with Windows ME, 98, et cetera are no longer necessary.

Navigate to Start > Control Panel > Power Options and set the power scheme to Home/Office Desk or Always On.

Home/Office Desk > None (AC) > Adaptive (Battery)
Portable/Laptop > Adaptive (AC) > Adaptive (Battery)
Presentation > Adaptive (AC) > Degrade (Battery)
Always On > None (AC) > None (Battery)
Minimal Power Management (AC) > Adaptive > Adaptive (Battery)
Max Battery > Adaptive (AC) > Degrade (Battery)

Source: http://www.dslreports.com/faq/5635
Adaptive = Performance state chosen based on CPU demand
Degrade = Starts at lowest performance state, then uses linear performance reduction (stop clock throttling) as battery discharges
None = Always runs at highest performance state
 

Perris Calderon

Moderator
Staff member
Political User
#3
Unlike previous versions of Windows, XP has native support for processor performance control. The operating system has built-in support for Intel SpeedStep and AMD PowerNow! Thus, the applets previously required for use with Windows ME, 98, et cetera are no longer necessary.

Navigate to Start > Control Panel > Power Options and set the power scheme to Home/Office Desk or Always On.

Home/Office Desk > None (AC) > Adaptive (Battery)
Portable/Laptop > Adaptive (AC) > Adaptive (Battery)
Presentation > Adaptive (AC) > Degrade (Battery)
Always On > None (AC) > None (Battery)
Minimal Power Management (AC) > Adaptive > Adaptive (Battery)
Max Battery > Adaptive (AC) > Degrade (Battery)

Source: http://www.dslreports.com/faq/5635
Adaptive = Performance state chosen based on CPU demand
Degrade = Starts at lowest performance state, then uses linear performance reduction (stop clock throttling) as battery discharges
None = Always runs at highest performance state
might have sved my life admiral, will give it a go
 

Perris Calderon

Moderator
Staff member
Political User
#4
not there admiral, I don't have "adaptive" anywhere I can find it...this is xp home

by the way, easiest way to get to the power management applet is to right click the power icon in the tray

at any rate I tried to navigate there per instructions but it's the same applet and I don't have those options

I did open this applet when I first had the issue and set it for "max battery" but that didn't do anything when plugged in
 

Admiral Michael

Michaelsoft Systems CEO
#5
It won't actually say adaptive. It explains how each power profile will behave in terms of CPU speed.

So for instance if you were to choose Max Battery and were connected to AC then the CPU speed would stay low and speed up when it's needed and then return to a slower and less power hungry state.

If you were to switch to battery then the will run at the slowest and less power state no matter what you do.
 

Perris Calderon

Moderator
Staff member
Political User
#7
It won't actually say adaptive. It explains how each power profile will behave in terms of CPU speed.

So for instance if you were to choose Max Battery and were connected to AC then the CPU speed would stay low and speed up when it's needed and then return to a slower and less power hungry state.

If you were to switch to battery then the will run at the slowest and less power state no matter what you do.
it doesn't work, I choose "max battery power" and the cpu is till clocked balls to the wall till I unplug
 
#9
That's the one. I use it religiously. I have no A/C and my shizzy D610 (work) was heating up something fierce....

The M chip inside (1862MHZ) was operating at 798MHZ due to the heat.

Speedswitch is awesome.
 
#14
An explanation of the tool from the site sums it up best, I've bolded the sole reason I'm using it on my system(s).


SpeedswitchXP is a small applet that sits in the system tray and allows dynamic switching of the frequencies of mobile Intel and mobile AMD CPUs under Windows XP. During the development of Windows XP, Microsoft decided to integrate dynamic frequency switching into the operating system itself. On a default Windows XP installation, the power schemes in the power settings of the system panel control the frequencies of the processor. On Windows 2000 and previous operating systems, it was possible to manually control the CPU frequencies with a SpeedStep applet provided by Intel, but this is not possible anymore under Windows XP. It is not very good documented what the different Windows XP power schemes do and it is impossible to fully adjust the schemes as the important settings are not accessible through the control panel.

SpeedswitchXP tries to fill this gap in that it provides access to ALL power scheme settings. This small applet is similar in functionality to the native Intel SpeedStep applet for Windows 9x/ME and Windows 2000 but with a few more options. Basically all it does is creating a power scheme under the power settings in the system panel and making this the default power scheme for Windows XP. When this is done, you can control all settings of this new scheme through the applet.
 

Perris Calderon

Moderator
Staff member
Political User
#15
An explanation of the tool from the site sums it up best, I've bolded the sole reason I'm using it on my system(s).


SpeedswitchXP is a small applet that sits in the system tray and allows dynamic switching of the frequencies of mobile Intel and mobile AMD CPUs under Windows XP. During the development of Windows XP, Microsoft decided to integrate dynamic frequency switching into the operating system itself. On a default Windows XP installation, the power schemes in the power settings of the system panel control the frequencies of the processor. On Windows 2000 and previous operating systems, it was possible to manually control the CPU frequencies with a SpeedStep applet provided by Intel, but this is not possible anymore under Windows XP. It is not very good documented what the different Windows XP power schemes do and it is impossible to fully adjust the schemes as the important settings are not accessible through the control panel.

SpeedswitchXP tries to fill this gap in that it provides access to ALL power scheme settings. This small applet is similar in functionality to the native Intel SpeedStep applet for Windows 9x/ME and Windows 2000 but with a few more options. Basically all it does is creating a power scheme under the power settings in the system panel and making this the default power scheme for Windows XP. When this is done, you can control all settings of this new scheme through the applet.
nicely done...that's why I was having trouble getting the laptop to step down through the native applet

I suppose there are some commands that does the trick but this is perfect...haven't overheated yet
 

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