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NAV flaw

#3
Ferral_Imp said:
Well there goes that idea of just upgrading Norton after Christmas. :( Anyone know where the extra strength crowbars are at? :eek:
I recently moved from Symantec 9.0 to NOD32, and I was quite impressed. It's fast, and was able to detect a few test trojans that SAV/NAV couldn't pick up. Kaspersky is another excellent alternative with possibly the best detection rate in the market today.

Big names like Symantec and McAfee seem to be losing the battle.
 
#4
It seems that everytime I read any tech news I'm seeing Symantec announcing yet another flaw in their firewall, antivirus, or both, products.

Norton is about the last AV's I'd ever resort to using. I'll stick with NOD32 or Kaspersky. I'd pick F-Prot, eTrust EZ AV and AVG Free 7 before Norton , as well.

rotjong
 

Steevo

Spammer representing.
Political User
#5
Wait, so.

1) You must get teh script downloaded
2) You must execute teh script
3) You must be signed in with admin rights

@ #1
Where have you been visiting to get teh script, and what about the blocker in Firefox, IE, Mozilla etc....
@ #2
They didn't point out how the script was executed, but I assume it was manually. So IF you get a a script and IF you happen to be digging around just randomly running stuff from your cache, IF most people knew how to find it you could be at risk.
@ #3
People who don't know better deserve it. I run with admin rights, but i have managed to prevent disaster by knowing whats going on. Not that I have ever been close to disaster.


I guess my point is, there is a one in a million chance that it could happen. But there are WAY more chances that a cup of coffee is spilled into a PC or the like. Mebey they could do a report on that.
 
#6
I was using AVG 6.0 on all my machines, but Norton Systemworks 2005 was on sale so I nabbed it from PC World, and when installed found 10 virii that I had thought might be affecting the machines performance. All of them had been missed by previous scans with AVG 6, so I think I'll stick with Norton for a while more :)
 

j79zlr

Glaanies script monkey
Political User
#7
What were the viruses? I've never seen AVG miss anything that NAV picked up. If you don't have heuristics enabled, or AVG configured properly then that is a different story.
 
#10
Just wanted to add this - don't always believe everything you read at face value. The "news" usually tends to blow things out of proportion, even more so when reporting something about large or well-known companies (it just generates more buzz). As Steevo mentioned in his previous post, it's probably not as big a deal as it's made out to be, much like so many other "security flaws" that nobody is really affected by.
 
#12
NetRyder said:
I recently moved from Symantec 9.0 to NOD32, and I was quite impressed. It's fast, and was able to detect a few test trojans that SAV/NAV couldn't pick up. Kaspersky is another excellent alternative with possibly the best detection rate in the market today.

Big names like Symantec and McAfee seem to be losing the battle.
Actually the only reason why I was considering upgrading to NIS2005 is cuz I intend to get a bigger hd for my laptop either right before Christmas or a little after (the 20 gig one that came with it is getting near critical mass and that's after removing all my music) and I don't particularly enjoy the prospect of spending 3+ hours getting all the updates for NIS2004 yet again.

But maybe I'll switch over to another complete internet suite then.
 
#13
You guys ever heard of Avast? We use it at work to clean all of the computers (I work at Best Buy, in the Geek Squad). It's really nice, the boot-time scanner OWNZ! www.avast.com to download a 60 day trial version. Really nice antivirus.
 
#14
I’ve used Norton for many years then at the beginning of this year found that my machine was infected by many undetected viruses so I switched to Kasperskey on the advice of our systems management. This does impact on system performance especially just after your desktop is loaded but it does catch most threats but by no means all as the virus writers are forever active. The (bit) that worries me most is that unlike ad-aware detection programmes that can be used on a machine three or four at a time, virus utilities cannot. You can only use and install one at a time.

It has slowly dawned on me that there is no single virus detection programme that provides a solution for all ills as the goalposts are changing so quickly. Maybe it’s time for some consolidation in this market as the writers of these viruses are becoming more and more professional and competent.

In the UK, only today, a news bulletin stated that the UK banks could no longer refund monies taken out of your account because of internet fraud. This is absolutely outrageous as they have “steered” customers in this direction now for many years to save bottom line costs, and now negate their responsibilities by seemingly issuing a joint statement.

Their servers have been hacked to death and its costing them billions. What can be done here? By the way most of them use NT servers.

This is so serious that I think we all should heed the warning. You could wake up on Monday with all your accounts equalling zero. The legal profession will then “clean up” yet again, or your bank could go to the wall. Either way we all lose.

:) :) :eek:
 

Steevo

Spammer representing.
Political User
#16
Most actually get their defs by having "honey pots" unprotected computers with Sir spammed alot e-mail addresses. Then they just find whats new and exciting and find a way to stop and or reverse the effects.

Alot do share information however. And the afore mentioned method is how most statistics are created for spread.
 

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