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How do developers come up with the #'s for the patch?

#1
Example I and my friend got into a long debate about patch #s.

He said

"First off the next patch will not be "1.10" If anyone knew about software upgrades/patches..or even the decimal system, you would know that 2.0 follows 1.9...or even 1.91 or 1.92 or sometimes written like 1.9.1 or 1.9.2. "


This is in reference to a recent patch from a game we play. I told him that I am not sure and he insist that he’s right and the company is wrong.

Can someone shed some light on this , I was always curious about this.
 

Sazar

F@H - Is it in you?
Staff member
Political User
#3
You can do the same with office projects as well. As you save revisions and changes, it can automatically update the version for you.
 

madmatt

Bow Down to the King
Political User
#4
All companies do it differently. There is no predefined standard, but Brad's post sums it up.

Builds are sequential but by the time it hits the market there might be a wide gap inbetween the previously released version and the new version. A lot of builds are internal builds and used for testing purposes.
 
#5
I usually use
Major.Minor
where major is function overhaul or something like that and minor represents a patch or bugfix

Ideally I should probably use Major for something bigger then Minor for overhauls (though not entire system overhauls that would be major) and then another option for patches and bugfixes. But as madmatt mentioned there is no predefined standard for version number schemes.

though first off what was the current patch number?

FreeBSD for example has -p# for patch levels and versions just increment from 0 on upwards with really minor revisions getting low point suffixes. ie 5.0.2. Though they have had 4.9, 4.10, 4.11
 

Sazar

F@H - Is it in you?
Staff member
Political User
#6
madmatt said:
All companies do it differently. There is no predefined standard, but Brad's post sums it up.

Builds are sequential but by the time it hits the market there might be a wide gap inbetween the previously released version and the new version. A lot of builds are internal builds and used for testing purposes.
Like matt's sig.

It is currently psuedo-hotpink ver 1.69

He is working his way up to 1.1337
 

madmatt

Bow Down to the King
Political User
#8
Sazar said:
Like matt's sig.

It is currently psuedo-hotpink ver 1.69

He is working his way up to 1.1337
Don't you two turn this around on me. I was told I would get my X1900 card faster if I made my sig pink.
 

Son Goku

No lover of dogma
#9
Nah, we just think you look "pretty in pink" :eek: :laugh:

Speaking of which, if you'll make your sig pink for a new card; would you wear pink for a whole new, $10,000 computer? :D Just an idea, not offering what I couldn't afford to buy right now...

Yes, and thx for getting the sig on a few lines :)
 

Perris Calderon

Moderator
Staff member
Political User
#11
so his question is could a revision go from 1.9 (one point nine) to 1.10, (one point ten) which though it could happen, it seems to mathematically incorrect
 

X-Istence

*
Political User
#12
Mathematical is not part of it. Companies can call it anything they want. FreeBSD has had versions 4.10, 4.11, 4.12, then 5.2.1. Most of the minor patches that fix just bugs are -p# like Geffy said.

It really depends on the organization. To most developers it is not all that weird to see patch 1.17 come out. I personally go with the FreeBSD system when it comes to patches. Major.minor-patchlevel.

Minor is really an understatement, as Major only changes when core functionality is really changed in such a drastic way that it provides something better over previous version, or breaks compatibility with older systems.
 

Mooz

Moozically Con~foozed
#13
M#.m#.b#

Major is any change that means the user would change the way they use a product ie a functionality change

Minor is a change that is visible but does not change the functionality

Build is a release that addresses bugs and fixes etc
 

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