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HD Video Camera

Bman

OSNN Veteran Original
#1
So I am going to Las Vegas in March 2010 and I would love to bring along a wicked HD video camera for the whole trip.

My spending amount for it would be around $1000, yes I mean for the camera not the trip lol Little less, little more. I don't know anything about them really, but I also plan to bring an external drive along, so I want to be able to remove the footage to pc or another storage device easy. I think a 720p camera would be fine but if i can get a 1080p for around that price then that would be awesome. And I guess decent photos as well. I don't know what else I would need, or want.

Suggestions, ideas...

Thanks.
 

assclown

OSNN Citizen Man
#2
Well, given you would want to take pictures too cuz that place is amazing, buy the new Canon T1i. It takes pictures and records awesome 1080p video. Get a huge memory card also. You would be set.
 

Bman

OSNN Veteran Original
#3
From the reviews of the Canon T1i and the Nikon D5000, neither do Video that great. Both have blurry issues and certain things depending on what you do. I want something that is video first, pictures second.
 

assclown

OSNN Citizen Man
#4
From the reviews of the Canon T1i and the Nikon D5000, neither do Video that great. Both have blurry issues and certain things depending on what you do. I want something that is video first, pictures second.
Not the videos I have seen. Looked crisp as hell. Quite possible you just have to know what you are doing to make it work well. Generally, video recorders are just "push a button" and they work.
 
#5
Digital Video and still for that matter have limitations compared to film. You need to work around them. My wife just can't get the hang of transitioning from film so she hates digital photography.

Limitations:
1) Digital has significantly less contrast so you need to make sure your recording is under exposed (too dark). If not the higlights get washed out. Most cameras will let you set the exposure for 1-3 stops darker than the camer's computer thinks is correct.

2) Digital can take pictures with less light BUT! the autofocus functions do not work or work very poorly in low light levels resulting in blurry pictures and video. Use manual focus indoors or at night unless you have a flash or flood light.

3) You have to hold the camera more steadily than with film since the effective "film speed" on digital tends to be lower (helps reduce digital noise from the sensor). Also, some camera's have a digital delay while the autofocus/autoexposure computer is processing the shot. So you have to pre-focus/expose (shutter halfway down) or hold the camera rock steady after you hit the shutter button.

4) Picture resolution gets really hammered with the compression algorithms in digital cameras. The transitions at edges are badly handled by compression algorithms and that produces apparent blurring. When wanting the best quality shots use the cameras uncompressed raw format and carry spare memory sticks..

In general digital cameras tend to push the limits on a shot further than a film camera so at the extremes (indoor, night, fast motion) they tend to blur more.

It's all a matter of practice with the new technology. Get the camera well before the trip and use it a LOT so you get the feel for it. Each camera has different quirks so being experienced with your old digital is no guarantee a new one will be any better.

Either of those cameras should work well.

When in doubt, rent one for a weekend and try it around home.
 

assclown

OSNN Citizen Man
#6
Limitations:
1) Digital has significantly less contrast so you need to make sure your recording is under exposed (too dark). If not the higlights get washed out. Most cameras will let you set the exposure for 1-3 stops darker than the camer's computer thinks is correct.

They only part i agree with on that statement is the fact that if you auto meter it will not have enough contrast. Just because your meter says it is good, doesn't mean it is. You have to know the scene you are shooting. If there is something more bright in an area than the rest of the scene, drop the camera a stop or so so there is no washouts. But that has nothing to do with it being digital. That is just a drawback to relying soley on a digital meter.

As for compression, RAW is the only way to go. High end cameras have hardly any compression and good algorithms so that doesn't generally factor in to anything you would be able to see on a print. Saving a picture over and over again is a HUGE no no as it decompresses and recompresses every time.
 

Bman

OSNN Veteran Original
#7
Digital Video and still for that matter have limitations compared to film. You need to work around them. My wife just can't get the hang of transitioning from film so she hates digital photography.

Limitations:
1) Digital has significantly less contrast so you need to make sure your recording is under exposed (too dark). If not the higlights get washed out. Most cameras will let you set the exposure for 1-3 stops darker than the camer's computer thinks is correct.

2) Digital can take pictures with less light BUT! the autofocus functions do not work or work very poorly in low light levels resulting in blurry pictures and video. Use manual focus indoors or at night unless you have a flash or flood light.

3) You have to hold the camera more steadily than with film since the effective "film speed" on digital tends to be lower (helps reduce digital noise from the sensor). Also, some camera's have a digital delay while the autofocus/autoexposure computer is processing the shot. So you have to pre-focus/expose (shutter halfway down) or hold the camera rock steady after you hit the shutter button.

4) Picture resolution gets really hammered with the compression algorithms in digital cameras. The transitions at edges are badly handled by compression algorithms and that produces apparent blurring. When wanting the best quality shots use the cameras uncompressed raw format and carry spare memory sticks..

In general digital cameras tend to push the limits on a shot further than a film camera so at the extremes (indoor, night, fast motion) they tend to blur more.

It's all a matter of practice with the new technology. Get the camera well before the trip and use it a LOT so you get the feel for it. Each camera has different quirks so being experienced with your old digital is no guarantee a new one will be any better.

Either of those cameras should work well.

When in doubt, rent one for a weekend and try it around home.
I just know many of my videos might be drunk videos, meaning fast movements. Each review I read said it had issues with that. My main concern is good quality, ease of use, and can capture everything in good quality.

The second is after the thought, at first its only for Vegas, capturing all of that. But I might later on want this for other things that might need more, so thinking of future is important.

I just feel like if I go with one of those camera's the video isn't getting enough attention, if you know what I mean. But if it's equal quality to just a video camera, then I am fine with that.
 

assclown

OSNN Citizen Man
#8
Agreed, and now what you are saying. Photography is my life, so I guess my opinion was bias. If you would be more into videography, then a camcorder would be best. But then again, if you are getting serious into it later, i would not buy one of those crappy small camcorders either. Just because they say HD, doesn't mean they are very good.
 

Bman

OSNN Veteran Original
#10
canon hf s10 is the best one out right now :)
Too bad it wasn't a bit cheaper, $1300 in Canada.

I might go with it, i haven't read too many reviews yet, is it really the best?

http://www.mostlydigital.ca/product/H117027/Hardware---Camera---Video-Camera/Canon-Vixia-HFS10

Just read some reviews, basically its the same quality to the HDC-HS300 from Panasonic, except a bit better image quality, but not worth the price increase. I am checking out reviews for the Panasonic now.
 
Last edited:

Bman

OSNN Veteran Original
#11
See I am stuck. I have always wanted a nice DSLR (graphic design, so goes along with photography). Yet right now I want more of a high end hd video camera. So do I lose too much going with something made as Video Camera first, do I lose too much going with something made as a camera first? That is my issue.

How much will technology be changing in the next 5 to 10 years. etc
 
#12
Well..... let's put it this way. You're not going on this trip for almost another year. The Canon EOS Digital Rebel T1i seems like quite a nice mix between having a DSLR as well as a HD video camera. It's also brand spankin new.

If you're serious about getting into photography and want a good DSLR, i don't think you could go wrong with the T1i..... but then again it would probably be best to wait it out.... read up on the T1i.... see what people are saying about it's photo quality (if it's on-par with what would be expected from a DSLR) and the video quality (if it's on par with what you'd find in a dedicated video camera). If it seems to be holding it's own.... it could be worthwhile to get, since you'd be killing two birds with one stone (cliche.... i know).
 

Johnny

.. Commodore ..
Political User
#13
When it comes to brand comparison; you can't compare a panasonic to a canon. That is like comparing a kia to a bmw lol ..
 
#14
kinda have to agree with Johnny. Haven't owned a digital camera other than canon (except for my ancient Sony Mavica..... which has two storage media.... Memory Stick, and FLOPPY DISK!), and i don't see myself buying any other camera from any other manufacturer anytime soon. I'm actually thinking about buying a new point-and-shoot to go along with my Digital Rebel XTi...... probably the Canon PowerShot SD780.
 

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