• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

DHCP Server Setup, Scopes and More

kcnychief

█▄█ ▀█▄ █
Political User
#1
So I was doing more reading for my next test, 70-291, and was really impressed of the power that a DHCP server can truly have. I have always understood DHCP, but now have a more thorough understanding of client/server roles, as well as APIPA.

I think the thing that impressed me the most, was the ability to control settings beyond just the client IP address. For example, you can setup the router, DNS Server and much more. Those are the two I used in my mock-setup, which made it much easier.

Referring to an earlier thread I had posted, my fix for the problem was configuring each client statically so I could point them to the proper DNS Server (the DC), rather than the ISP. Doing this, in combination with enabling NETBIOS over TCP/IP, I have alleviated my speed issues.

I haven't tested the DHCP Server settings in the environment I had this speed issue yet, but I would imagine this would make my life MUCH easier. In the current scenario, I have to manually configure each client, and adding new machines involves more administrative overhead.

Also, after learning that NETBIOS over TCP/IP really shouldn't be implemented if there aren't any "legacy" clients (I know that is pre-XP, but for this discussion I am using Pre-2K), I think I might disable it.

I will be interested to see if the DHCP Server Settings will alleviate my speed problems, and hope I can ditch NETBIOS over TCP/IP.

I know I babbled, and went off on tangents, but it's a habit :)

Thoughts anyone?​
 
#2
Well, the DHCP is supposed to setup the network settings for the host, so having power over gateway router and dns server settings for the host makes sense does it not?

I have isc-dhcpd and tinydns running on a FreeBSD box on my network that I use for internal lan dns and dhcp configuration. The most useful feature is that I can tell the DHCP server to assign the host with the MAC address of X the ip address which maps to the domain name of x.y.lan

this is mainly useful because I only have to keep one list of hostnames to ip addresses up to date.
 

kcnychief

█▄█ ▀█▄ █
Political User
#4
Geffy said:
Well, the DHCP is supposed to setup the network settings for the host, so having power over gateway router and dns server settings for the host makes sense does it not?

I have isc-dhcpd and tinydns running on a FreeBSD box on my network that I use for internal lan dns and dhcp configuration. The most useful feature is that I can tell the DHCP server to assign the host with the MAC address of X the ip address which maps to the domain name of x.y.lan

this is mainly useful because I only have to keep one list of hostnames to ip addresses up to date.
Yes, makes total sense. If I understand what you say in paragraph 2, that is a IP Reservation which is also a great feature. There were reasons that I needed to uses static IP's for a few occassions, and I don't any longer :)
 
#5
yep, I use the Mac addresses to 'hardwire' the machines to their ip addresses and therefore their domain names but also means that I dont have to go around setting static ip addresses on a bunch of hosts.

I also have a dynamic range which also has dns addresses allocated to them
 

Members online

No members online now.

Latest posts

Latest profile posts

Hello, is there anybody in there? Just nod if you can hear me ...
Xie
What a long strange trip it's been. =)

Forum statistics

Threads
61,961
Messages
673,239
Members
89,014
Latest member
sanoravies