Transporting HDDs

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by vern, Jun 4, 2003.

  1. vern

    vern Dominus Political User Folding Team

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    In a few weeks, I'm going to be moving. I will be moving back to the United States from the Philippines.

    How would I go about transporting my HDDs? Should I just carry them on? If I do ... will I get data loss when they scan through my bags? Or should I take them out at that point?

    What other factors could destroy data in my HDD? I'd like to have zero data loss since I'd like to be able to restore my system once I settle in.

    I could also ship them via freight along with other household items ... which would arrive later. I'd imagine this wouldn't be as wise though.

    If you guys could share your experience when travelling long distances with data .... that'd be great.
     
  2. Krux

    Krux Nissan Powered

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    unless the metal detecters have extremely powerful magnets in them I would say your pretty safe to take them through, other wise just pack them up in a antistatic bag and wrap it with bubble wrap and just pack them away like anything else they should be fine either way.
     
  3. ElementalDragon

    ElementalDragon The One and Only

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    Well, if the scanning things used high power magnets..... i'd sure hope ur luggage does not have magnetic zippers :D That would kinda suck now wouldn't it? go to run your luggage through, and they take 10 minutes to pry your suitcase off of the inside of the machine.:eek:
     
  4. canadian_divx

    canadian_divx Canadian_divx

    ok there are a few things that you might want to tell them when it goes through the scanner if it is on your carry on or what ever, a hdd disk is a very very dence material, explocives are very very dence material and they show up as black on there scanners, yell them that it is a hdd so they dont have to go through everything, they may just incase so have it somewhere that it is easy to get at
    other than that you should be fine but if you are flying there might be one more thing, i rember a few years ago about the pressure in a HDD exploding or something like that in an airplane, dont know if it was roumer or not but yea is to ovoide that have it as a cary on if you are flying.

    but other than thoes things, just make sure that nothing can hit it hard and just be carful with waht ever bag it is in, lots of bubbel rap and tape with an antistatic bag like Krux said

    i cant think of anything else to tell yea, this is what has come to my knolage about traveling with computer hardware.
     
  5. ElementalDragon

    ElementalDragon The One and Only

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    errm... i've never heard of a HDD exploding due to pressure, especially cause of the fact that there is nothing on the inside of a HDD that would be affected by pressure changes. I've heard of LCD screens on laptops bursting during takeoff. that's why they usually say to turn off all electrical devices or whatever before the plane takes off. And if you don't want them to really search the carry-on or whatever you may put the hard disk in, you could probably just show it to them or something instead of hiding it in the luggage. and if you do have it in something and you decide to show it to them...... don't remove it from the luggage too fast. ;) That.... Might not be too good of an idea if you watch a bunch of action movies and stuff like that.

    On second thought about the magnets, i don't think they would affect the hard disk in any way at all. If ya think about it, there are usually 2 pretty powerful magnets sitting relatively close to the platters of the hard drive. And as far as i know, the only thing that is actually attracted to a magnet inside a hard drive is the part that the magnets are stuck to, screws, and possibly some other very tiny parts on the inside/outside of the hard drive. So... i still wouldn't suggest it if they actually DO use high powered magnets.
     
  6. Taurus

    Taurus hardware monkey

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    i think the theory is that the air in the air-tight hd would explode out if left in the cargo hold at 32,000 feet.

    but i just realized the cargo hold is pressurized anyway. so i don't see a reason for a hd to explode at all.
     
  7. vern

    vern Dominus Political User Folding Team

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    Thanks for everyone's replies. You all have been very helpful. I have decided to take my two 80 gig HDDs as carry-on. I feel a bit safer carrying them on than having them with my luggage. I'll inform the people scanning the bags that I have two HDDs in my luggage, and I will probably just take them out ... just in case the magnets have any effect on the disks. If you guys think theres a better way ... by all means tell me. Thanks again for everyone's help.
     
  8. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

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    I think the X-rays can mess the data up too. :)

    The drive will only explode if it's airtight (plus high altitude if course). Most (new anyway) drives are not. Ever noticed the "do not cover this hole" note on hdd:s?
     
  9. Nick M

    Nick M Moderator

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    That's what it's for! All these years, that infamous hole, I could never figure out what it was for :)
     
  10. Taurus

    Taurus hardware monkey

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    if they're not airtight, then how do they keep dust particles from getting on the platters?
     
  11. ElementalDragon

    ElementalDragon The One and Only

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    Taurus, Air tight means that air can't get into or out of it. In the case of hard drives, they are SEALED, but not to the point where they are considered air tight. most of the hard disk's i've taken apart have a small layer of a soft foam-rubber type stuff around the edges between the top cover and the bottom part that has the circuit board and stuff on it. Another way that dust cannot get into it is cause they are made in a room that is actually much cleaner than a doctor's office (for those of you that might not know, it's actually called a Clean Room (Go Figure)). has nearly NO dust in it. If a room to make a hard disk in is cleaner than a doctor's office..... imagine what is all floating around when you have surgery. :confused: I don't even think OLDER hard disks are entirely air tight.
     
  12. Taurus

    Taurus hardware monkey

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    that makes more sense than the air hole idea. the foam would keep dust out. but maybe there's a foam-type filter element under hole though, too? :confused:
     
  13. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

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    Well... errr... maybe not just in case you're taking it for a flight... :D


    Yep. I've seen photos of drives with it, but now, of course, I can't find any. Some Seagates however seem to have an air canal around the discs. That could be what it is anyway... :)
     
  14. scriptasylum

    scriptasylum Moderator

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    Just to be safe, what about creating images of your drive to CDs or DVDs? It'll take quite a bit of CDs, but at least you'll have a restore option in case.

    That's just what I would do...
     
  15. LeeJend

    LeeJend Moderator

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    Aside from the technical considerations (data loss etc.)

    1). You can expect one hell of a hassle trying to carry any electronic equipment through airport security these days. We have stopped doing it for work because if you can't turn it on and show somebody it's not really a bomb it (and maybe you) may end up in custody.

    2). There are software and hardware import/export laws whereevery you go. You could get hit with customs charges for importing it to your destination country. You may need proof of purchase for the software on it and the Hard drive. If you took it from the US to the Phillipines in the first place do you have documentation showing that you made the technology export in the first place and are just returning it? Talk to the airline and the consulate in the Phillipines before you try to hand carry anything back (I'm assuming you are flying commercial, not military or government transport).

    I was on one business trip to the Bahama's once and on the way back into the USA 2 million dollars worth of equipment was confiscated by customs because the "pilot forgot to bring the manifest with him". We had taken the equipment out with us. We got it back after about 3 months.
     
  16. vern

    vern Dominus Political User Folding Team

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    I have already backed up around 30 CDs in case I do have any data corruption. I hate to have to restore my system from scratch. My current HD has gone from ME, Win2k, WinXP without reformating. This may seem like bad practice ... but I have gotten quite comfortable with the clutter of everything.

    Wouldn't this only apply for items over a certain amount? I would assume that it would be easier to bring back 2 hard disks than to bring any produce or something of that sort. I bought the hard disks in the Philippines, and it's I've even forgot about the proof of purchase. Wouldn't it be possible to claim it as something personal? I have brought hardware before to the US (laptops, cds, writers, etc) but it was no problem. Just in case ... I'll check all this with the travel agent.