Supress Remote Shutdown Message

Discussion in 'Windows Server Systems' started by kcnychief, Feb 1, 2008.

  1. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

    Messages:
    16,948
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    I'm trying to write a script that will run from a workstation, to shutdown a server remotely. It seems to not be working because there is a dialog that is waiting for an OK before proceeding. Here is the syntax:

    shutdown -s -m \\server01

    Here is the message waiting on the server (see attached)

    How can I force this to occur without the dialog? I looked at the command line args and nothing is obvious?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Dark Atheist

    Dark Atheist Moderator Political User Folding Team

    Messages:
    6,376
    Location:
    In The Void
    /p ? /f ?
     
  3. Shamus MacNoob

    Shamus MacNoob Moderator Political User

    Messages:
    4,199
    Location:
    L'Ile Perrot Quebec
    C:\Users\Don Carnage>shutdown /?
    Usage: shutdown [/i | /l | /s | /r | /g | /a | /p | /h | /e] [/f]
    [/m \\computer][/t xxx][/d [p|u:]xx:yy [/c "comment"]]
    No args Display help. This is the same as typing /?.
    /? Display help. This is the same as not typing any options.
    /i Display the graphical user interface (GUI).
    This must be the first option.
    /l Log off. This cannot be used with /m or /d options.
    /s Shutdown the computer.
    /r Shutdown and restart the computer.
    /g Shutdown and restart the computer. After the system is
    rebooted, restart any registered applications.
    /a Abort a system shutdown.
    This can only be used during the time-out period.
    /p Turn off the local computer with no time-out or warning.
    Can be used with /d and /f options.
    /h Hibernate the local computer.
    Can be used with the /f option.
    /e Document the reason for an unexpected shutdown of a computer.
    /m \\computer Specify the target computer.
    /t xxx Set the time-out period before shutdown to xxx seconds.
    The valid range is 0-600, with a default of 30.
    Using /t xxx implies the /f option.
    /c "comment" Comment on the reason for the restart or shutdown.
    Maximum of 512 characters allowed.
    /f Force running applications to close without forewarning users.
    /f is automatically set when used in conjunction with /t xxx.
    /d [p|u:]xx:yy Provide the reason for the restart or shutdown.
    p indicates that the restart or shutdown is planned.
    u indicates that the reason is user defined.
    if neither p nor u is specified the restart or shutdown is unpl
    anned.
    xx is the major reason number (positive integer less than 256).
    yy is the minor reason number (positive integer less than 65536).


    Seems obvious that the /P is leaning towards what your looking for
     
  4. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

    Messages:
    16,948
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    I thought that, but that says local PC.

    I am running this from another computer, so I have to use the /m switch which handles remote PCs and interpreted the /p as only working locally?

    I'll give it a whirl, but not sure that would do what I'm looking for. Also hard to test without a timeout, I would like to have at least a few seconds so I can abort during my testing.
     
  5. Shamus MacNoob

    Shamus MacNoob Moderator Political User

    Messages:
    4,199
    Location:
    L'Ile Perrot Quebec
    The parameter is after the local command , so it will apply to the target I am pretty sure..
     
  6. Dark Atheist

    Dark Atheist Moderator Political User Folding Team

    Messages:
    6,376
    Location:
    In The Void
    /t xxx Set the time-out period before shutdown to xxx seconds.
    The valid range is 0-600, with a default of 30.
    Using /t xxx implies the /f option.

    /f Force running applications to close without forewarning users.

    :)
     
  7. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

    Messages:
    16,948
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    I know about the /t, but the default without using the /t is 30 seconds which I'm fine with.

    I did try with the /f option but it still presents the message I have to click OK on.

    I'll give the /p a try later on tonight or this weekend and see if that does the trick.
     
  8. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

    Messages:
    16,948
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    OK, well the /p does not work on its own, I need to use the /d switch a long with it.

    Traveling to the site tomorrow as the /p doesn't provide a warning and I want to be able to abort or manually turn the system back on. It looks as if the combination of those will do the trick since the /d gives me the ability to provide a reason.

    Stay tuned!
     
  9. Electronic Punk

    Electronic Punk Administrator Staff Member Political User Folding Team

    Messages:
    18,590
    Location:
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    /t 1 and they won't know what hit em :)

    There is a great tool called poweroff as well which will let you do it with a gui and then show you what the command would have been.
     
  10. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

    Messages:
    16,948
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Maybe I'll throw a /t switch at the end - anyways this got postponed until tomorrow. Dang schedules!
     
  11. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

    Messages:
    16,948
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    ****er! This still won't work, even tried disabling the logging of shutdown reasons.

    Am going to just schedule the task for it to shut down, but that's lame!

    I did look at poweroff, but can't get it to show the command I would need? Rubbish!