Static IP question

Discussion in 'Windows Desktop Systems' started by BouncingSoul, Aug 20, 2006.

  1. BouncingSoul

    BouncingSoul Stranger Than Fiction Political User

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    Hey all,

    I've got a router managing my network, it has DHCP enabled and works fine for everyone but me. I seem to randomly change IP's when my lease is up but all the other stations stay the same or inherit my old one. Not a big deal but whenever that happens I have to change all my port forwarding to my new ip and its getting old quickly. What I want to do is set my IP to be static and keep the other stations on DHCP. First off is that possible? Secondly, assuming the first one is possible, do I just specify my static ip in the windows TCP/IP properties or do I have to do something on the router as well? Hope this makes sense and someone can help me out.

    Thanks
     
  2. Heeter

    Heeter Overclocked Like A Mother

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    Leave the dchp alone from the router standpoint, but put in a manual IP address/subnet/gateway/dns servers in your TCP/IP properties.

    I did that on my setup, works just fine.


    Heeter
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2006
  3. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

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    Yeah, as he said it will do just fine.

    Hard-code your current IP as your address, make the DNS and Gateway addresses the IP of your router.
     
  4. BouncingSoul

    BouncingSoul Stranger Than Fiction Political User

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    Will do. Thanks all!
     
  5. ming

    ming OSNN Advanced

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    Not sure if your router allows this, but on my Netgear DG834GT, I have restricted access with a fixed IP for each PC. eg. my laptop will always be 192.168.0.3 no matter whether i renew/release the IP from the laptop side.
     
  6. Weasel

    Weasel Define 'Cynical'

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    Just remember to keep it out of the DHCP range or you're going to run into problems. You should also be able to setup a static IP using the dhcp server according to your MAC address somewhere in the router settings.
     
  7. j79zlr

    j79zlr Glaanies script monkey Political User

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    I agree with Weael. Set the DHCP starting IPs to something like 192.168.1.100, then you can assign static IPs from 192.168.1-192.168.99, assuming the statndard 192.168.1.0 network with a 255.255.255.0 subnet.
     
  8. fitz

    fitz Just Floating Along Staff Member Political User Folding Team

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    As stated above.. you can:

    1) Assign a static IP address and change your DHCP server so that the static IP you assigned falls out of the scope of management (ie: make sure your DHCP does not assign the static IP address to another machine).

    2) Setup a DHCP reservation so your computer always is assigned that IP Address. This configuration varies but it always will require your MAC address of the network card.
     
  9. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

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    MAC address method is probably the best way to go, wether it be via a DHCP reservation on your DHCP server or something similar on your router - pending your setup.

    I prefer methods that don't have to be re-done in the event of a system crash where a re-image/re-install is necessary. One less thing to have to worry about and/or verify. That is, of course, unless you change the NIC.
     
  10. Mainframeguy

    Mainframeguy Debiant by way of Ubuntu Folding Team

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    which (these days) is likely onboard the mobo :rolleyes: ... One reason in this case if it were myself I would likely (strangely!) elect to add a suitable PCI NIC to the mix. Then you are good to go for mobo upgrades... until you go PCIexpress... but then I don't doubt you can (tell me if I am wrong :nervous: ) get a PCIexpress NIC now!! :eek: :rolleyes:
     
  11. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

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    I agree that most are onboard, but sometimes motherboards get replaced. It's not a likely scenario but it still happens.

    Haven't seen any PCIx Network Cards as of yet, who knows if we ever will.