slackware

Discussion in 'Linux & BSD' started by punkandacoke, Dec 11, 2003.

  1. punkandacoke

    punkandacoke eat me

    Messages:
    255
    Location:
    at the end of the rainbow
    Im thinking about installing slackware...but 4 CD's!!
    do I really need all four of them?
     
  2. j79zlr

    j79zlr Glaanies script monkey Political User

    Messages:
    2,725
    Location:
    Chicago
    nope, you should only need the first 2 at the max, I haven't installed 9.1 yet, but with 9.0 you only need the first one. The other cd's usually just have packages and such on them.
     
  3. NetRyder

    NetRyder Tech Junkie Folding Team

    Messages:
    13,256
    Location:
    New York City
    Yeah, only the first two. The last two CDs are the source.
    Enjoy Slack...it's a superb distro. :)
     
  4. punkandacoke

    punkandacoke eat me

    Messages:
    255
    Location:
    at the end of the rainbow
    thanks guys.
    most of the packages that are on the other cd's are availible on the net, correct?
     
  5. SPeedY_B

    SPeedY_B I may actually be insane.

    Messages:
    15,800
    Location:
    Midlands, England
  6. NetRyder

    NetRyder Tech Junkie Folding Team

    Messages:
    13,256
    Location:
    New York City
    Here's how I go about it:

    - Check http://www.linuxpackages.net for all your tgz needs, and just use installpkg to set it up :D
    - If there's something you can't find, you can always get the source archive and use the usual "./configure", "make", "make install" routine.
    A nicer way is to install CheckInstall (look here). Once you have that installed, you go through the same procedure but use "checkinstall" at the end instead of "make install." This basically does the same thing as "make install" but also creates a Slackware tgz package out of it. So you can safely delete the source and the Makefile, and just use pkgtool/removepkg to uninstall it later.
    - Another alternative when tgz packages are unavailable is to download rpm packages, and use Slackware's built-in "rpm2tgz" command to convert them to tgz packages. Remember that you still have to install the dependencies yourself though.

    That's it :)
     
  7. Xie

    Xie - geek - Subscribed User Folding Team

    Messages:
    5,275
    Location:
    NY, USA
    you can always go to the source (no pun intended) at slackware.org.
     
  8. j79zlr

    j79zlr Glaanies script monkey Political User

    Messages:
    2,725
    Location:
    Chicago
    I just installed 9.1, I'm happy they included the broadcom 440x driver. It was a pain to install on 9.0. (read here for info), actually not hard after figuring out how to do it ;) but anyway, looks nice, I wish slack had an easy update procedure like BSD or Gentoo (thats next on my list)
     
  9. NetRyder

    NetRyder Tech Junkie Folding Team

    Messages:
    13,256
    Location:
    New York City
    Yeah, the Broadcom drivers were a welcome addition. :)
    As for upgrades, have you checked out Swaret? It's not nearly as elegant as the ports tree in BSD/Gentoo, but it does the job quite well. I actually upgraded my entire Slack installation from 9.0 to 9.1 using that. Just don't ever use it to update the kernel.
     
  10. j79zlr

    j79zlr Glaanies script monkey Political User

    Messages:
    2,725
    Location:
    Chicago
    Thanks NetRyder, never used that before, going to have to check it out. I really only screw around with slack a little here and there, since its on my main PC which is usually booted into XP.
     
  11. j79zlr

    j79zlr Glaanies script monkey Political User

    Messages:
    2,725
    Location:
    Chicago
    Thanks for the heads up on swaret NetRyder, seems to work like a treat. I just installed 9.1 and upgraded to -CURRENT, took about 35min. Very cool. Off to fight with my onboard sound...