raid 0 and image backup

Discussion in 'Windows Desktop Systems' started by greggustin, Mar 23, 2006.

  1. greggustin

    greggustin OSNN Addict

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    Never used raid before, so -
    If I have 2 drives as raid 0
    and 3rd drive for data and backup
    do I treat drives 1 and 2 as ONE system drive?
    will it 'look' like just a "c:drive"
    can I do an image back up like I do now?
    can it be restored to a single system drive later
     
  2. Steevo

    Steevo Spammer representing. Political User Folding Team

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    In a system where you have 3 drives for speed and redundancy RAID 5 would be the better choice.Then if you have a failure on any one drive the array can be rebuilt on the fly, with no data loss. As well as a performance boost when a controller doesn't use the system processor for the RAID algorythim.
     
  3. greggustin

    greggustin OSNN Addict

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    will research raid 5
    how is that different than raid 0+1?
    also most new MB have raid 0, or 1, or 0+1
    have not seend any with 5

    and
    is performance same if raid is built in - or via add-in card?
     
  4. fitz

    fitz Just Floating Along Staff Member Political User Folding Team

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    Raid 5 uses 3+ drives and stripes data + parity info across each drive. The parity information is useful to access data when (note I say "when" and not "if") a drive failes. In a RAID 5 scenario, when a drive fails, you can still access all data (although your performance will suffer). If 2 drives fail, however, you Screwed. RAID 5 is very fast for data reads, a little slower (compared to RAID 0) on the data write.

    RAID 0+1 is a mirrored stripe set - requires at least 4 drives with each pair in a stripe set and one stripe set mirroring the other. No parity information is calcuated or written.

    I won't get into RAID 1+0, but it is different (and better) than RAID 1+0 but most consumer boards don't really support it. Last time I checked (it has been a while since I built a custom system), most onboard RAID on the consumer side only support RAID 0, RAID 1, and RAID 0+1

    3rd party RAID controller performance depends greatly on which controller you buy and the feature set on the controller. Buying a RAID controller with a larger cache can improve performance significantly depending on your disk usage. Buying a server class SCSI Raid controller large (battery backed) write caches can have a huge performance advantage.

    Lots more info on RAID can be found on the web.. check Wikipedia for a start.
     
  5. greggustin

    greggustin OSNN Addict

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    thanks fritz
    matches my research for the day
     
  6. fitz

    fitz Just Floating Along Staff Member Political User Folding Team

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    *blink* *blink*

    fritz?

    :rolleyes:

    lol :)
     
  7. Terrahertz

    Terrahertz Extinction Agenda Political User Folding Team

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    Well if he is using the third drive as backup the go for Raid0 I say. Yeah there are many lvls of Raid and Intels matrix Raid gives you good performance and data insurance. It mirrors while giving the speed benefits of Raid0.[If your using Intel tech] Its your first time it seems so have fun. Also turn off system restore on the raid drives to boost performance.
     
  8. mlakrid

    mlakrid OSNN BASSMASTER Political User Folding Team

    and hes right most mobos only support Raid 0 or Raid 1 because only 2 drives are supported in the RAID feature..

    OR... you can buy a PCI RAID controller card with up to four ports from what I have seen so far...

    Raid 0 without QUESTION has the best performance... bar NONE... especially if you use Western Digital Raptors as your HDD of choice Like me :D