Pagefile location

Discussion in 'Windows Desktop Systems' started by DasBoot, Apr 27, 2003.

  1. DasBoot

    DasBoot Guest

    I have 2 HDD on same controler
    1. 120 G ATA 133 with windows on it
    2. 30 G ATA 66

    1Gig 333DDR RAM

    Where should I put pagefile and what size it should be?
     
  2. Glaanieboy

    Glaanieboy Moderator

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    :) Welcome to NTFS DasBoot!

    It is always wise to put the pagefile on you fastest disc, in your case the 120 GB one.
    As for the size, it is said that 1.5 to 2 times the size of your physical RAM should be sufficient, you don't really need it since you have a large amount of RAM. But - assuming your using Windows XP or 2000 - Microsoft recommends to have at least 384 MB of pagefile RAM. To be on the safeside (many apps like video-editing software and photosoftware use pagefile RAM) you can set it to 512 MB.
     
  3. DasBoot

    DasBoot Guest

    Thanks Glaanieboy
    quick question is it posible to put whole pagefile or a secondary pagefile2.sys on a RAM Disk?
     
  4. Glaanieboy

    Glaanieboy Moderator

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    Nope. A page file (or virtual memory) is an extension to your physical RAM, it can only be put on you harddisk.
     
  5. GoNz0

    GoNz0 NTFS Stoner

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    if you had that much spare ram then disable the paging file and it will stay in the ram anyway wont it. no need for ram disk is there :huh:
     
  6. Perris Calderon

    Perris Calderon Moderator Staff Member Political User

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    ahya!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


    no, you need 4 gigs of ram to run without virtual memory

    cheeshe

    there are even tweaks for real power users to get xp to use more then the max pf of 4096.

    there is no user that will ever speed up by lowering the default size of the pf, and plenty that will slow down...even those with two gigs of ram.

    in addition, when xp thinks it has too big a pagefile because you have so much ram, it changes it's algorythim

    for instance, if you have two gigs of ram, xp will only assign a two gig pagefile, and not a 3 gig pagefile as 1.5 would suggest

    xp has this covered...ms has resaerched, benchmarked, and looked at all these "pagefile improvements".

    you will never have a faster computer with a smaller pagefile then the default..

    some people will definately have a slower computer if they lower the default

    just let the os manage your pagefile, and you will have the best settings.

    if you ever see the screen that xp is expanding your pagefile, that's the only time you need to adjust the settings, and you need to make the initial minimum bigger.

    NOBODY SHOULD EVER MAKE THE INITIAL MINIMUM SMALLER THEN DEFAULT AND EVERY SINGLE USER THAT DISSABLES EXPANSION IS MAKING A MISTAKE
     
  7. Glaanieboy

    Glaanieboy Moderator

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    Where-ever there is a pagefile, there is a perris :rolleyes:
     
  8. Perris Calderon

    Perris Calderon Moderator Staff Member Political User

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    also glaanie, the pagefile is not an extension to your ram, and while this has been used to explain the pagefile, it is a weeK explanation, used in the beginning as the easiest way to explain it to people without knowledge, and it has lead to all this "you don't need a big pagefile if you have alot of ram" nonsense

    the pagefile is a storage aea for your ram information.

    that's what it is.

    figure it out from there, the math is simple
     
  9. Glaanieboy

    Glaanieboy Moderator

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    I see a contradiction here...

    Though you might know a lot about this thing, I almost have a diploma for it (as a part of Aries A+ training). When your physical RAM is full, the OS copies a part of the physical RAM to your virtual memory and thus freeing up physical RAM.
     
  10. Perris Calderon

    Perris Calderon Moderator Staff Member Political User

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    your statment is correct, glaanie..."When your physical RAM is full, the OS copies a part of the physical RAM to your virtual memory and thus freeing up physical RAM."..THIS DOES NOT MAKE IT AN EXTENSION, IT MAKES IT A STORAGE AREA. (your statement is correct, but not complete, as in addition to this informationm the os also writes to disc long before you need to access the pagefile, so that when the time comes that you do put pressure on ram, the transition is seemless...at no penalty in performance)

    and some people think the two are synonymuos...they are not.

    the os would like to be able to assign an address for however much ram you have installed, as your explanation points out...it does not use the harddrive instead of ram, it stores the ram information, and then brings it back into ram...PLUS, this isn't done untill it's neccessary to do it, and dissableing this function, or reducing the ability to do it in any fassion is counter productive.

    xp thinks, heaven forbid, you might use all of the ram you bought to speed your box.

    again, the math is simple...let's see now, if I have two gigs of ram, how much area would the os like to have for adress translation?

    in addition, some programs request even more memory then written in code, so as to occomodate your future use.

    I'm leaving for most of the day.

    have fun without me.
     
  11. yoyo

    yoyo _________________

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    For size I would just let the system manage it. With 150 GB, disk space shouldn't be an issue.

    Another point, I may be wrong here, not one of my specialties, but I think running an ATA 133 and an ATA 66 drive on the same controller will slow down the faster drive to also ATA 66. You may consider if you could change this.
    Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.
     
  12. DasBoot

    DasBoot Guest

    Im using INTEL 485PEBT2 motherboard with Intel Application Accelerator and 120 G drive shows UDMA-5
    30 G UDMA-2 ???
    Controller Information
    IDE Controller: Intel(R) 82801DB Ultra ATA Controller, ICH4
    Storage Kit Build(s): 2.3.0.2164,
    Storage Kit Installed: 2.3.0.2164
    Driver Build: Intel Application Accelerator Driver
    Driver Version: 2.3.0.2160
    IDE Controller Tri-State: IDE Controller enabled
    PIO Mode Support: 0 - 2 - 3 - 4
    DMA SW Mode Support: 2
    DMA MW Mode Support: 1 - 2
    UDMA Mode Support: 0 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5
    Disk Timeout Value: Default
    CDROM Timeout Value: Default
    CD Audio Timeout Value: Default
    UDMA on 80 conductor cable only: Default, Disabled
    Flush Enable: Default, Disabled
    Ping Pong Enable: Enabled
    Primary Master: WDC WD1200JB-00CRA1
    Model: WDC WD1200JB-00CRA1
    Firmware: 17.07W17
    Device Type: ATA - Fixed
    PIO Mode Support: 0 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 4
    DMA SW Mode Support: No Support
    DMA MW Mode Support: 0 - 1 - 2
    UDMA Mode Support: 0 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5
    LBA (28-bit maximum): 0x0DF94BB0
    LBA (48-bit maximum): 0x00000DF94BB0
    CHS: 3FFF x 0010 x 003F
    CHS Sectors: 0x00FBFC10
    Disk Size (28-bit maximum): 111.8 GB (120,034,123,776 bytes)
    Disk Size: 111 GB (120,034,123,776 bytes)
    Default Transfer Mode: UDMA-5
    Current Transfer Mode: UDMA-5
    Transfer Mode Limit: No Limit
    Cable Type (Device): 80 Conductor
    Cable Type (Host): 80 Conductor
    PIO PPE: Enabled
    UDMA Control Register: Ultra DMA Mode Enabled
    UDMA Timing Register: CT = 3 CLK / RP = 16 CLK
    Base Clock: Ultra DMA 100 Timings
    Auto-Acoustic Management: Disabled
    Dynamic APM on AC: Feature not supported by device.
    Dynamic APM on Battery: Feature not supported by device.
    Primary Slave: Maxtor 93073U4
    Model: Maxtor 93073U4
    Firmware: BAC51JJ0
    Device Type: ATA - Fixed
    PIO Mode Support: 0 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 4
    DMA SW Mode Support: No Support
    DMA MW Mode Support: 0 - 1 - 2
    UDMA Mode Support: 0 - 1 - 2
    LBA (28-bit maximum): 0x0393FDE0
    LBA (48-bit maximum): 0x00000393FDE0
    CHS: 3FFF x 0010 x 003F
    CHS Sectors: 0x00FBFC10
    Disk Size (28-bit maximum): 28.6 GB (30,735,581,184 bytes)
    Disk Size: 28 GB (30,735,581,184 bytes)
    Default Transfer Mode: DMA MW-2
    Current Transfer Mode: UDMA-2
    Transfer Mode Limit: No Limit
    Cable Type (Device): 80 Conductor
    Cable Type (Host): 40 Conductor
    PIO PPE: Enabled
    UDMA Control Register: Ultra DMA Mode Enabled
    UDMA Timing Register: CT = 2 CLK / RP = 4 CLK
    Base Clock: Ultra DMA 33 Timings
    Auto-Acoustic Management: Custom, 0xC0
    Dynamic APM on AC: Disabled
    Dynamic APM on Battery: Disabled
     
  13. DasBoot

    DasBoot Guest

    ATA 33 on 66 HDD

    Why my 30G ATA 66 hard drive runing at 33?
    spec. in post above.