How Do I Know My Current Master/Slave Setup

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by thebear, May 1, 2003.

  1. thebear

    thebear d(-.-)b

    Messages:
    364
    Location:
    Toronto, Canadia
    newbie :)

    anyways, I want to install a new hard drive...I currently have one hard drive connected directly to the CPU. Then I have a CD-Rom and CD-R sharing a cable, it looks like the CD-R has the connector at the end of the cable.

    What I want is my second HD to be primary slave to be used for RedHat 9...but to be honest I cant tell what I have now and how to switch it
     
  2. Un4gIvEn1

    Un4gIvEn1 Moderator

    Messages:
    1,084
    The original harddrive is most likely a Primary Master. The CD Rom drives are on the Secondary channel and assuming that your PC was built properly your CD-R is the primary. Master drives are supposed to be on the end of the cable, Slave drives are usually in the middle. Of course you have to set the jumpers on the drives for the correct things as well. Setting Cable Select (CS) allows the drives to auto detect slave or master. Hope this helps you.

    Good luck!
     
  3. thebear

    thebear d(-.-)b

    Messages:
    364
    Location:
    Toronto, Canadia
    so since there is a connector in the middle of the cable on my HD, would I plug it into that one (my new HD that is)
     
  4. Un4gIvEn1

    Un4gIvEn1 Moderator

    Messages:
    1,084
    Yes.. that would be the Primary Slave. Make sure to set your jumpers correctly before doing it though.
     
  5. thebear

    thebear d(-.-)b

    Messages:
    364
    Location:
    Toronto, Canadia
    jumpers the cables form the power supply right?
     
  6. Un4gIvEn1

    Un4gIvEn1 Moderator

    Messages:
    1,084
    no.. the jumpers on the drives.
     
  7. thebear

    thebear d(-.-)b

    Messages:
    364
    Location:
    Toronto, Canadia
    uh, whats a jumper...told ya im a newb :huh:
     
  8. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

    Messages:
    4,006
    Location:
    Sweden
    A jumper is a small plastic casing around a metal inner used to short two pins. The way you insert the jumpers decide the Master/Slave/CS setting. Instructions are normally printed on the drive.

    Note: The position on the cable only matters if you use Cable Select ("the cable selects"). So if you use Master/Slave just put it where it fits.
     
  9. Un4gIvEn1

    Un4gIvEn1 Moderator

    Messages:
    1,084
    A jumper is a little plastic thing (metal on inside) that you place over 2 leads that shorts them. If you look in the documentation for your new harddrive it will probably explain it. They are usually located between the power and IDE input on the harddrive. They are very small.
     
  10. thebear

    thebear d(-.-)b

    Messages:
    364
    Location:
    Toronto, Canadia
    ah, I see what ur talking bout...thanks a LOAD Un4gIvEn1 and Zedric... this place gets more usefull everyday, lol
     
  11. Un4gIvEn1

    Un4gIvEn1 Moderator

    Messages:
    1,084
    I am gonna have to argue this one. In most cases this WILL work, but it is not correct. You CAN set a drive as a master and put it in the middle of the cable but it's not standard and may cause problems.
     
  12. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

    Messages:
    4,006
    Location:
    Sweden
    Maybe so. I've tried most combinations (mobo in middle and so on) on most hardware and it always worked. :)
    Only problem have been too long cables.
     
  13. Un4gIvEn1

    Un4gIvEn1 Moderator

    Messages:
    1,084
    IDE cables are a poor design really. Most people only have 1 HD. The Master input is in the middle of the cable. By having 6 inches of cable just hanging there you create an antenna for signal disturbance.
     
  14. Un4gIvEn1

    Un4gIvEn1 Moderator

    Messages:
    1,084
    HAHA... I just contradicted myself. Ignore me. The OLD IDE cables were setup that way. The new ATA compliant ones are Master on the end and Slave in the middle. Blue usually goes into the board, Black into Master and Grey into Slave.
     
  15. Taurus

    Taurus hardware monkey

    Messages:
    3,206
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    still not a very good thing. the signal has to travel that much farther and the whole length of the cable is still the 'antenna'. it doesn't have to be an open end to accept interference.

    essentially; the shorter the ide cable, the better. but it's a pain to find short ones and get the right length. so we just use the 18"-ers and put up with the occasional hiccup that comes with them. :)
     
  16. Indomidable

    Indomidable Guest

    That's why they're now selling shielded-rounded ATA cables to reduce the interferance and increase the transfer rate.
     
  17. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

    Messages:
    4,006
    Location:
    Sweden
    Which is a sort of contradiction in itself. Rounded cables pack the wires closer together so the interference between the wires in the cable mock up the signals and reduce max speed instead. Best would be a shielded flat cable but I think that would be clumpsy...

    Aw, heck just use a shielded serial-ATA cable. :) That should be good.