Deploying software issues.

Discussion in 'Windows Server Systems' started by Heeter, Aug 26, 2007.

  1. Heeter

    Heeter Overclocked Like A Mother

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    Hey all,

    Would like to know what you guys do about software that doesn't install nicely through a server.

    I got some software (Quickbooks, Simply Accounting, etc) that didn't come with .msi files, and they aren't working properly for the users in the domain, unless they have full admin privileges.

    Any thoughts?


    Heeter
     
  2. madmatt

    madmatt Bow Down to the King Political User

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    Store it on the server and go around desktop to desktop and install it from the share.
     
  3. Heeter

    Heeter Overclocked Like A Mother

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    Thanks Matt,

    That's what I ended up doing with a couple of them. Now that you mention that, I think that I am just going to keep all the cd images on the server.

    Heeter
     
  4. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

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    ^That's what I do, works well. Master CDs are all kept offsite for DR reasons :)
     
  5. Heeter

    Heeter Overclocked Like A Mother

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    But it is frustrating in that these pieces of software are not working well in a domain setup. they are intended to work in a stand alone machine. When the user logs on, the software only works partially. Some won't take updates from the software manufacturer site, even though I assigned the user as a power user on the workstation.

    Oh well, I think that I need to vent, thanks for listening to me out. Maybe I have to rethink how I am setting up the workstations...............


    :disappointed:


    Heeter
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 26, 2007
  6. LordOfLA

    LordOfLA Godlike!

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    Power users don't get anywhere near the permissions needed for software updates to work :)
     
  7. Heeter

    Heeter Overclocked Like A Mother

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    If I set them up as administrator at the workstation, not in the Server, won't the user be able to install software on the workstation at that point? This is what we are trying to avoid, because of previous history.



    Heeter
     
  8. LordOfLA

    LordOfLA Godlike!

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    Yes. But nobody has ever yet justified not giving admin rights to workstation users given that 99% of windows and windows software assumes that all users have admin rights. This in turn creates unnecessary work and preventable issues when you remove those rights from users.
     
  9. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

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    Heeter - what I typically do is give people admin rights for the first two weeks after a new PC or New Workstation setup. I don't really let them know, I more simply make sure the station is setup for thier job needs. If I know for sure it is beforehand, or after the two weeks I drop them down to normal users.

    It's a happy medium you have to find, best of luck.
     
  10. omg its nlm

    omg its nlm lvl 17 Hax Folding Team

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    I use AutoPatcher and make my own modules.
     
  11. madmatt

    madmatt Bow Down to the King Political User

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    I would never, ever use AutoPatcher in a network environment, e.g. a business network.
     
  12. Heeter

    Heeter Overclocked Like A Mother

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    Thanks, D.

    I think that will be going this route. I will upgrade their status to admin on the workstations. then will drop them back to power user afterwards.

    I am doing some research on the various software that I am dealing with. I have found that one of these pieces of software can work in a terminal server environment with a whole swack of configging needed.

    I think that I might present the boss of this company this idea and see if he let's me test drive this. I think that this boss is getting frustrated at how slow the transition is from a 10 year old workgroup setup with each machine being so buggered up from spyware and viruses to this new domain setup.

    Anything of the top your guys heads that I should watch for?

    Thanks a million for all you guy's inputs, really much appreciated.

    Heeter
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2007
  13. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

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    Each environment is unique, not much you can really do to plan ahead of the unknown. If you manage multiple environments, I recommend using the same "flavor" of Windows Server, and design your IP schemas, OUs and everything else the same. Makes everything much easier :)
     
  14. madmatt

    madmatt Bow Down to the King Political User

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    I agree to a certain extent. The first portion depends on what the job calls for. Some small businesses can't afford two servers which makes Small Business perfect, especially for those who want Exchange.

    However, I agree with the second half of that statement. =]
     
  15. kcnychief

    kcnychief █▄█ ▀█▄ █ Political User Folding Team

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    Good point as always Matthew :)
     
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