Computer To Computer

Discussion in 'Windows Desktop Systems' started by Sazz, Jul 24, 2002.

  1. Sazz

    Sazz Guest

    Hiya,

    I know its possible to im between two computers on a network.
    I am on a network and was wondering how i could do this because i have forgotten.
    Dont know if theres any extra info you would need but both computers are using XP and netgear networking hardware.

    Thanks. :)
     
  2. JJB6486

    JJB6486 Retired Mod Political User

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    West Lafayette, IN, USA
  3. Black_Pride

    Black_Pride OSNN Addict

    Messages:
    108
    great link, but it says NOTHING about IMming between two computers on a network.
     
  4. if they are both connected to internet you can im back and forth with messenger or aim

    if just local try winchat, its built into windows just go to start/run/ and type "winchat" on both computers
    a chat window will open put in name of other computer on one.... off you go
     
  5. JJB6486

    JJB6486 Retired Mod Political User

    Messages:
    1,207
    Location:
    West Lafayette, IN, USA
    Or use Net Send messages

    Start->Run "Net Send Computername Type Your Message"

    Replce Computername with the name of the computer it is to be sent to. Replace Computername with the workgroup name to broadcast a message to all computers on the LAN

    I didn't read it right the first time and thought he was trying to network Computer to Computer, not im

    JJB
     
  6. vdubVR6

    vdubVR6 Guest

    huh:confused: which one is it?


    or do you have to actually type in both?
     
  7. Gary Pandher

    Gary Pandher Moderator

    Messages:
    884
    computer name if its one computer
    computer's work group if its multiple computers
    rite???...hehe....i think:D
     
  8. Net Send

    Sends messages to other users, computers, or messaging names on the network.

    Syntax
    net send{name | * | /domain[:name] | /users} message

    Parameters
    name
    Specifies the user name, computer name, or messaging name to which you want to send the message. If the information that you supply contains spaces, use quotation marks around the text (for example, "Computer Name"). Long user names might cause problems when you use them as NetBIOS names. NetBIOS names are limited to 16 characters, and the sixteenth character is reserved.
    *
    Sends the message to all the names in your domain or workgroup.
    /domain:name
    Sends the message to all the names in the computer's domain. You can specify name to send the message to all the names in the specified domain or workgroup.
    /users
    Sends the message to all users connected to the server.
    message
    Required. Specifies the text of the message.
    net help command
    Displays help for the specified net command.
    Remarks
    You can send a message only to a name that is active on the network. If you send the message to a user name, that user must be logged on and running the Messenger service to receive the message.
    You can broadcast a message to all of the names in your computer's domain (use * or /domain), or a different domain (/domain:DomainName). Broadcast messages can contain up to 128 characters. Use discretion when you send messages to multiple users.
    /users lets you send a message to all users who have sessions with the server. Use discretion when you send messages to multiple users.
    The Messenger service must be running for messages to be received. For more information about how to start a service, see Related Topics.
    Examples
    To send the message "Meeting changed to 3 P.M. Same place." to the user robertf, type:

    net send robertf Meeting changed to 3 P.M. Same place.

    To send a message to all users connected to the server, type:

    net send /users This server will shut down in 5 minutes.

    To send a message that includes a slash mark (/), type:

    net send robertf "Format your disk with FORMAT /4"

    put net send in help search and will yeald infowinchat
     
  9. Using Windows Chat in Windows XP
    The information in this article applies to:
    Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
    Microsoft Windows XP Professional


    Chat Overview
    You can use Windows Chat on your computer to communicate with someone on another computer. Both computers must be connected to the same network (for example, a local area network [LAN] or the Internet). Also, each computer must be running a similar protocol, such as TCP/IP.

    Chat is interactive. You see a reply to your messages as the other person types it. The Chat window is separated into two panes: one contains the messages you send, and the other contains the messages you receive.

    To Start Windows Chat
    Click Start, and then click Run.
    Type winchat, and then press ENTER.
    To Make a Chat Call
    On the Conversation menu, click Dial.
    Click the computer name, or type the computer name, for the person with whom you want to chat, and then click OK.
    When the person with whom you want to chat answers the call, begin typing in the Chat window. You cannot begin typing until the person you are calling answers.
    If the person you are calling does not answer, or you want to end the call, click Hang Upon the Conversation menu.
    The messages from the person with whom you are chatting appear in the lower pane or the right pane, depending on how your Chat window is arranged.
    To Answer a Call
    To answer a call, click Chat, which appears on the taskbar when someone uses Chat to call your computer. Or, if your Chat window is already open, click Answer on the Conversation menu.

    Note that you must have Chat running or have the Network DDE service started to answer a call. To start the Network DDE service:
    Click Start, click Control Panel, click Performance and Maintenance, and then click Administrative Tools.
    Double-click Computer Management, double-click Services and Applications, and then double-click Services.
    In the Details pane, click Network DDE.
    On the Action menu, click Start.
    To have the Network DDE service start automatically every time you start your computer:
    Click Start, click Control Panel, click Performance and Maintenance, and then click Administrative Tools.
    Double-click Computer Management, double-click Services and Applications, and then double-click Services.
    In the Details pane, click Network DDE.
    On the Action menu, click Properties.
    On the General tab, in Startup type, select Automatic, and then click OK.
     
  10. Sazz

    Sazz Guest

    Thanks very much. :D
     
  11. bahiano

    bahiano Guest

    use net meeting, it's easy. one pc must be the host, then you can add to this session the other pcs on your lan. (i use this on mi lan with 6 pcs)
    sorry my english :)
     
  12. bahiano

    bahiano Guest

    with netmeeting you can chat, talk and see over the lan