cable internet

Discussion in 'Windows Desktop Systems' started by Tdoan14, Apr 2, 2003.

  1. Tdoan14

    Tdoan14 Guest

    i might be getting cable internet from cox. should i get a cable modem from them or should i get it from best buy or some other place? and i plan to share internet connection with another computer, and was wondering what do i need to do this? should i install myself or let the expert people do it??? what is needed to connect what to what? thank u in advance for responses...
     
  2. Jewelzz

    Jewelzz OSNN Godlike Veteran

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    Why rent from Cox when you can purchase elsewhere cheaper. Plus if you ever move the modem goes with you.
     
  3. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

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    The easiest way to network (and the best IMO) is to get a broadband router. Plug the cable modem into the router on one side (WAN side) and the computers on the other (LAN side). 5 mins config and you're done. :)
     
  4. Tdoan14

    Tdoan14 Guest

    do i need any type of cards installed in my PC?
     
  5. Taurus

    Taurus hardware monkey

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    just a network card (nic). if you don't have one, your board might have it built-in. if neither, they're about $10-$15 in store.

    to share the connection between multiple computers, do like sazar suggested and get a router with a built-in 4 or 5-port switch. best way to go.

    i'm not familiar with getting an aftermarket modem to work with a service. i was told a few years ago when i got cable that there's no gaurantee that a particular modem will be compatible with a particular service. i haven't heard anything really since so maybe it's a load of crap and all cable internet services use the same protocols or whathaveyou. good luck.
     
  6. Friend of Bill

    Friend of Bill What, me worry?

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    Also, don't tell them you want to share the modem because they'll want to charge you a premium even though you are sharing your bandwith with multiple computers under the same roof (this applies to many greedy companies).:D
     
  7. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

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    He did? Where?

    The name is Zedric. ;)
     
  8. scriptasylum

    scriptasylum Moderator

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    lol.
     
  9. Taurus

    Taurus hardware monkey

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    lol, ouch... that's what i get for having so many threads open at once. :eek: sorry.
     
  10. damnyank

    damnyank I WILL NOT FORGET 911

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    I believe in Murphy's Law - you know the one that says "if anything can go wrong it will" - so I figure for $3 a month - I'll rent a cable modem and if anything goes wrong (since it's on 24/7) it is their cost to replace it!:p
     
  11. Tdoan14

    Tdoan14 Guest

    ok...

    tell me if i get this wrong...

    1. get a network card
    2. get a cable modem
    3. sign up for cox high speed internet
    4. get a router
    5. plug the cable modem to the router
    6. plug the router to the network card?
    7. enjoy fast downloads.... :happy:

    *i'm not sure what the network card does, do both computers have to have network cards? am i supposed to plug something to it?*:huh:
     
  12. brassman

    brassman Guest

    Yes, each computer needs a network card.
    Run a cat 5 cable from the modem to the wan side of the router.
    Run a cable from the lan side of the router to the network card of your computer.
    Run another cable from the lan side of the router to the network card in the remote computer.
     
  13. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

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    Location:
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    Yes exactly.

    A network card is needed in each computer (they may allready have one). Without a network card you can't plug into a network.

    The CAT5 cable (aka TP (twisted pair), UTP (unshielded), STP (shielded)) connector (RJ45) looks like a phone plug, just slightly bigger.