Bunch of questions:

Discussion in 'Linux & BSD' started by Herkalees, Mar 25, 2003.

  1. Herkalees

    Herkalees Guest

    I have a website and a second computer. Currently I pay someone to host my website with limited support and abilities, and my secondary computer just sits around. I also have a copy of Linux RedHat 7.1 and an open port on my DSL router. It crossed my mind that I may be perfectly capable of hosting my website off of my own secondary computer out of my house, I think I have all the necessary tools.

    My question to you folks is this: Since I've never hosted a website before (I've only made them and uploaded them), do I infact have all the things necessary?

    I know that my computer will have to remain running 24-7 (my website only see's 50 visitors a day at the max). I'm 90% sure that this OS is perfectly capable of being a webserver, and I ask this: I looked for an update function such as "Windows Update" where it scans the pc and returns a list of necessary updates to install, but I had no luck finding anything. Is this possible?

    Are my PC's specs good enough: 700mhz PIII, 512 SD-RAM, 15 gig HD, and Linux RedHat 7.1. ??

    Also, will Dreamweaver MX work on Linux, or should I look for a particular application meant for Linux?


    I appreciate any and all answers, as this is a new potential venture/project for me...
     
  2. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

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    Sounds like a plan Herkalees! :)

    The specs are way good (look at my server in the sig ;)). If you're not using the machine for anything special now I suggest you download the latest RedHat instead, 8.0. It includes a webserver (Apache) and also has an update utility (up2date).

    Dreamweaver won't work (afaik there is no Linux version, may be wrong) but that doesn't matter. You still make the pages on your primary computer (Windows right?) and store them on the server (just a normal fileshare with Samba). So you can still use Dreamweaver. That's the way I do it and it works swell. :)
     
  3. Herkalees

    Herkalees Guest

    I have another somewhat related question:

    In an effort to bring this project up to date with the latest version of RedHat, I went to their website and downloaded the 3 different .iso's (psyche-i386-disc1.iso, psyche-i386-disc2.iso and psyche-i386-disc3.iso) and burned them onto their own disks.

    The instructions on the Redhat website say to simply insert disk 1 into the CD-ROM drive and boot off of it as you would any install disk.

    All I get when I insert Disk 1 and reboot is the computer simply loading up into my previously installed Redhat 7.1., almost like this disk I made isn't a boot disk.

    Do I need to unpack the .iso file and burn it's contents to the blank cd, or just burn the .iso file like i have (though it's not working)?

    Should I boot into 7.1 and look for some kind of upgrade option, then load in my 3 disks?

    Thanks!
     
  4. canadian_divx

    canadian_divx Canadian_divx

    did you set it in your bios to boot from cd???
     
  5. renakuajo

    renakuajo Guest

    i'm not an expert but i bet you need to unpack the .iso file with iso buster or winiso, if i'm wrong sorry(but i dont think so :))
     
  6. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

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    No unpacking needed, just burn it. BUT! Make sure you do it the right way. The wrong way is to drag the file onto the CD and burn it.

    The right way is to burn the iso as an image (File->Burn image in Nero). When the CD is burnt the contents should be some files and folders and not the iso file.

    Also make sure that BIOS tries to boot from the CD first like canadian_divx said.
     
  7. lurker2100

    lurker2100 Guest

    One thing I haven't seen anyone mention: IP address. I see that you have a DSL connection, but does it use a dynamic IP? If so, I think you'll have to sign up for some sort of dynamic DNS service. If you have a static IP, then there's no problem.
     
  8. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

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    True that. :)

    But he's still trying to install Linux. There's still a way to go before we get to that.

    Anyway, www.no-ip.com is good for this.
     
  9. Herkalees

    Herkalees Guest

    Ah, theres my problem... I tried it two ways: burning the *.iso files to individual disks, then I unpacked them with WinRAR and burnt all the individual files to seperate CD's. Neither worked... because I am using WinXP's built in burner.

    I stupidly deleted the .iso files, and now only have folders of each one containing unpacked files after WinRARing them...

    So, from what I am learning from you guys, I need to redownload the 3 .iso files, then install Nero, and use a particular burning method to do this appropriately?

    Thanks for this info.
     
  10. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

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    Yes.

    - The Windows burner can't burn ISO:s at all (craaap!).
    - If you unpack and burn the files you will miss out on the bootable part of the CD needed to boot.

    Good thing CD:s are cheap. :)
     
  11. Herkalees

    Herkalees Guest

    Thanks all, it worked, I now have Redhat 8.0 running perfectly on my 2nd box. I have you and Nero to thank.

    Now, onto turning it into a web server... more questions to come later!
     
  12. RabidPenguin

    RabidPenguin Guest

    Redhat 9.0 is to be released to the general public on April 7th.

    All linux distros Include Apache Server and His Redhat 7.1 has the up2date proggy also.
     
  13. Zedric

    Zedric NTFS Guru Folding Team

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    Yes, but since he had'nt found them I made it clear that they were there. Maybe I was a bit unspecific, but I didn't think it would matter.

    Herkalees: Glad it works. :) I answered your other thread btw.
     
  14. X-Istence

    X-Istence * Political User

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    Do note that you will soon run into trouble, Red Hat 8.0 uses xinetd and has no way to go back to inetd, and since more than 90% of all servers like pop3, smptp, and stuff like that require it, you are basically screwed or need to know a lot about it.

    I personnally would not suggest hosting it off a DSL, it could be slow, and i doubt its very stable.