Bored?

Discussion in 'Green Room' started by ming, Oct 20, 2004.

  1. ming

    ming OSNN Advanced

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    Anyone here got excessive time that they need to kill?

    Was wondering if anyone would like (or be kind enough) to write up a guide on how to set up a home server or any guide for that matter. :rolleyes:
    With that said, does anyone know of any websites that offer guidance on setting up a home server? I tend to find only file servers or webservers, but nothing that's for private home use.
     
  2. SPeedY_B

    SPeedY_B I may actually be insane.

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    Elaborate on server, it's a term that can mean almost anything.
     
  3. ming

    ming OSNN Advanced

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    One that's not hosting websites or FTP basically.
    Something like a central location where all clients can run programs off. Like those found in Universities... (well I think they run from a central location).
     
  4. Son Goku

    Son Goku No lover of dogma

    Are you looking for a terminal server then? I think MS has a terminal server edition for this (if one is talking about Windows apps). Or are you trying to run Linux apps on remote stations?
     
  5. Mainframeguy

    Mainframeguy Debiant by way of Ubuntu Folding Team

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    yes - ^^ - it all depends what you want to run, and anything set to run from a server has to be designed that way, and not so many are...... because not many need to be (yet)....

    In the future I see this changing, but that future has to be one where not each HOUSE has a computer, rather each ROOM has SEVERAL (and they all want to run similar apps) - then it makes sense....

    Until then it is for the universities... IMHO
     
  6. Son Goku

    Son Goku No lover of dogma

    BTW, if we're talking Windows apps...there was a program, Symantec's PC Anywhere that allowed one to access their computer from elsewhere. I also ended up using it (after securing) to allow a friend to see win2k RC before the thing came to market (was MSDN subscriber then). The main issue with the thing was security. This did allow one to run apps remotely, though when I was in the dorms and browsed one day I noticed other student's comps were exposed and an app could be launched off of one.

    Mind you, I didn't do anything (nor would I), except perhaps open up notepad and save a text file on their desktop warning them their computer is exposed as such, perhaps having left directions on securing their box. Was a long time ago, so don't remember.

    This might be something you could try...but keep in mind security if you do...
     
  7. ming

    ming OSNN Advanced

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    No point in having a server at home then I take it. (exception of web/ftp server)
     
  8. Son Goku

    Son Goku No lover of dogma

    It depends what you're doing. I've heard some run their own email server, and for awhile there I had an Oracle enterprise 9i running on my comp. That had more to do with taking a class in DBA 1 though...

    Generally speaking, servers aren't as common at home as in a corp, but that doesn't mean it can't be done. But one needs to know what it will be serving up to the network, as from there things can change greatly.

    A print server could also be useful if one had only 1 printer and wanted to share it, or a samba server if one wanted to use Linux and well... But just mentioning server only tells us so much. Depending on what you want PC Anywhere might fit the bill, though you might want to (if your broadband uses a router) block the port it uses at the router, unless you want your PC accessible over the Internet...
     
  9. ming

    ming OSNN Advanced

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    Was thinking of sharing apps, hosting games... and print server as you mentioned.
    Wanted to conserve disk space on some client machines as I don't want to make HD upgrades unneccessarily, and also, running things from a central enables easier updating of software.
     
  10. Son Goku

    Son Goku No lover of dogma

    OK, sounds like PC Anywhere might be something you want to look into then. Windows Terminal Server edition could do some of this; however as Mainframeguy mentioned the apps would have to be set to run this way.

    I did mess around with Terminal Server Edition for NT 4.0 (or perhaps it was win2k) a long time ago, and when I went to install MS Office, it required me to run a seperate setup for running the progs over the network.

    Other thing is this would be seperate OS software, and NT, 2k, or 2003 Server is going to cost more then workstation. Then one gets the per seat liscensing and what not. Games aren't going to tend to be network aware as such (for running it over a network)...

    PC Anywhere isn't client server, but rather peer to peer, but does allow one to bring up the desktop from one PC on another. One does have to load the software on both computers though, and then the app can be accessed through PC Anywhere. But I reiterate, look through the security settings (if you go this route) and make sure you lock the boxes down with a password at least. Alternatively, if you have a router, set an ACL to deny access to the port PC Anywhere is setup to use, over the WAN (interface that connects to the ISP, as opposed to your hub or switch) interface.

    You can look here, to see if this does some of what you want

    http://www.smallbusinesscomputing.com/biztools/article.php/2216181

    BTW, you can get download only copies for less on the Internet (OEM versions), though that price listed is way more then I paied. Some of the security does seem to be improved since the version I tried. Also you're a home user, not a small business...so all I'll say is look around, and leave the rest to your own discretion.