after installtion of new drive, comp. boots up too slow now

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by scsa20, Apr 14, 2003.

  1. scsa20

    scsa20 Simonsoft Network

    Messages:
    236
    Location:
    Mars
    Okey, I've just installed a 250 gig hard drive into my system... instead of having it hooked up to the motherboard, it's connected to some controller card all by itself... I still have my main hard drive (C) and my old download drive (D) on the same riben that goes into the mother board.

    well... after puting in the new drive, installed the correct drivers (well... actully, I was unable to use the drivers provided by Western Digital because XP alreadly put in the drivers for it -_-') the new drive was in, then also pop in that tool kit thingy disk to format the new drive.

    Now whenever I boot up, I get some message saying "Dedeciting |/-|\-|/" or something like that (you know, a line spening around after the word "dedecting" or whatever) then it shows the XP boot screen for a second or 2 then takes me to my welcome screen and sits there for a min. after that min. it takes me into Windows and I have to wait another 2 mins or so before all the programs loads up...... it wasn't like this before o_O is there anything I could do to speed up the processed some?? like add more RAM??
     
  2. jonifen

    jonifen pffff...

    Messages:
    705
    have you checked the manufacturers website (whoever made the controller card) for newer drivers? Also, what chipset do you use on your PC? Is it Intel? If so, try the Application Accelerator prog from intel.com - I heard this is to do with HDDs plugged into the intel based motherboards, so while this may not help the new hdd, it may help the others.

    Also, what file system are you using? FAT32/NTFS?

    And one final thing... how much do you have loading on boot??!! Or is it only a few things and its deadly slow?
     
  3. Hipster Doofus

    Hipster Doofus Good grief Charlie Brown

    Messages:
    5,920
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    See if this applies>

    Symptoms
    After you choose to start Windows from the Boot menu, you may experience a long delay (or pause) before your computer finishes starting. Note that this delay may range from 10 seconds to a minute. Also, this delay occurs before the Starting Windows progress bar appears, and your computer may appear to stop responding (hang) during this time.

    Cause
    This behavior can occur if Windows is installed on a drive or a partition to which Windows cannot gain access with normal Basic Input/Output System (BIOS) INT-13 or INT-13 extension calls. When Windows Setup determines it cannot use BIOS calls to start, it uses scsi() or signature() syntax in the Boot.ini file instead of multi() syntax.

    When booting a system that requires scsi() or signature() syntax, Ntldr loads an additional device driver (Ntbootdd.sys) to initialize and interrogate the boot controllers in your computer. Ntldr then seeks the associated boot drive attached to the controller to finish loading the kernel. These additional operations take more time in Windows because of the Plug and Play nature of the operating system.

    This behavior is expected, however, Windows Setup may use scsi() or signature() syntax, even if your computer can boot using the normal BIOS calls. This may occur on Integrated Drive Electronics-based computers when using a large capacity boot drive. In this case, you can try adding an additional entry in the Boot.ini file and use multi() syntax on the new entry to boot from. Note that if this works, your computer starts without pausing.
     
  4. scsa20

    scsa20 Simonsoft Network

    Messages:
    236
    Location:
    Mars
    I don't know it does that (boots up slow after installtion) but the controller card came with the hard drive (it's a Western Digital drive, so I don't know if it's there brand or someone elses).

    here's some specs on my motherboard and such:

    NVIDIA nForce2 Chipset Based K7N2-L mainboard
    512 MB DDR-RAM
    AMD Athlon XP 2500+
    File System: NTFS